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VIDEO: Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir may offer improved patient reported outcomes

SAN DIEGO — In this exclusive video from DDW 2016, Zobair Younossi, MD, MPH, chairman of the department of medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, and vice president for research of Inova Health System, discusses new data showing the pan-genotypic regimen of a fixed-dose combination of Sovaldi (sofosbuvir, Gilead Sciences) and velpatasvir (Gilead Sciences) was associated with improved patient reported outcomes, or PROs.

“Our data basically combined the ASTRAL-1 data in terms of PROs, ... which is quality of life, work productivity and fatigue,” Younossi said. “When we analyzed the 740 patients in this trial — and this was comparing the active drug to placebo for the first time — you see improvement of quality of life and PROs during treatment, while you’re not seeing any improvement with placebo. In fact, at the end of achieving sustained virologic response, patients who received active drug had substantial improvement of their PROs while patients who received placebo did not.”

Reference:

Younossi ZM, et al. Abstract 812e. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-24, 2016; San Diego.

Disclosures: Younossi reports consulting for AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences and Intercept, and serving on advisory committees or review panels for AbbVie and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

SAN DIEGO — In this exclusive video from DDW 2016, Zobair Younossi, MD, MPH, chairman of the department of medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, and vice president for research of Inova Health System, discusses new data showing the pan-genotypic regimen of a fixed-dose combination of Sovaldi (sofosbuvir, Gilead Sciences) and velpatasvir (Gilead Sciences) was associated with improved patient reported outcomes, or PROs.

“Our data basically combined the ASTRAL-1 data in terms of PROs, ... which is quality of life, work productivity and fatigue,” Younossi said. “When we analyzed the 740 patients in this trial — and this was comparing the active drug to placebo for the first time — you see improvement of quality of life and PROs during treatment, while you’re not seeing any improvement with placebo. In fact, at the end of achieving sustained virologic response, patients who received active drug had substantial improvement of their PROs while patients who received placebo did not.”

Reference:

Younossi ZM, et al. Abstract 812e. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-24, 2016; San Diego.

Disclosures: Younossi reports consulting for AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences and Intercept, and serving on advisory committees or review panels for AbbVie and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

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