In the Journals

Heartburn-predominant vs. regurgitation-predominant GERD patients had poorer QOL

Patients with heartburn-predominant gastroesophageal reflux disease had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores compared with patients with regurgitation-predominant disease, according to new research data.

To assess quality of life in GERD patients, researchers from Taiwan compared data from heartburn-predominant (n=108) and regurgitation predominant (n=124) patients collected between January 2009 and July 2010 at Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Patients were stratified by predominant symptoms, and subgroups (erosive esophagitis [EE] and nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]) were determined by endoscopic findings. Demographic data and GERDQ, GERD impact scale and Short Form 36 questionnaire scores were collected.

Demographics were comparable between groups except there were more men in the heartburn group (57.4% vs. 38.7%; P=.044). Daily sleep interruptions were experienced by 22.3% of the heartburn-predominant group compared with 4.8% of the regurgitation-predominant group (P=.021). They also had more daily eating or drinking problems (27.8% vs. 9.7%; P=.008), more work interferences (11.2% vs. 0%; P=.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs. 64.69; P=.042).

The NERD subgroup within the regurgitation-predominant group had more impaired daily activities compared with the EE subgroup, particularly daily eating or drinking problems (11.8% vs. 7.1%; P=.002) and work interferences (50% “sometimes” vs. 26.5% “sometimes;” P=.046).

“In the present study, GERD patients with heartburn and regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but heartburn predominance had a more negative impact on daily activity and general health scores,” the researchers concluded. “In general, the NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did.”

Disclosure: Relevant financial disclosures were not provided.

Patients with heartburn-predominant gastroesophageal reflux disease had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores compared with patients with regurgitation-predominant disease, according to new research data.

To assess quality of life in GERD patients, researchers from Taiwan compared data from heartburn-predominant (n=108) and regurgitation predominant (n=124) patients collected between January 2009 and July 2010 at Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Patients were stratified by predominant symptoms, and subgroups (erosive esophagitis [EE] and nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]) were determined by endoscopic findings. Demographic data and GERDQ, GERD impact scale and Short Form 36 questionnaire scores were collected.

Demographics were comparable between groups except there were more men in the heartburn group (57.4% vs. 38.7%; P=.044). Daily sleep interruptions were experienced by 22.3% of the heartburn-predominant group compared with 4.8% of the regurgitation-predominant group (P=.021). They also had more daily eating or drinking problems (27.8% vs. 9.7%; P=.008), more work interferences (11.2% vs. 0%; P=.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs. 64.69; P=.042).

The NERD subgroup within the regurgitation-predominant group had more impaired daily activities compared with the EE subgroup, particularly daily eating or drinking problems (11.8% vs. 7.1%; P=.002) and work interferences (50% “sometimes” vs. 26.5% “sometimes;” P=.046).

“In the present study, GERD patients with heartburn and regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but heartburn predominance had a more negative impact on daily activity and general health scores,” the researchers concluded. “In general, the NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did.”

Disclosure: Relevant financial disclosures were not provided.