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VIDEO: Shortened esophagus increases risk for hernia recurrence

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video, Scott Gabbard, MD, from the Cleveland Clinic, discusses a study presented by his team at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

They evaluated the rate of hiatal hernia recurrence after surgery and explored the relationship between hernia recurrence and esophageal length.

“What can happen after a hiatal hernia is the stomach comes up into the chest cavity, and the esophagus, over time, will shorten,” Gabbard told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “When the surgeon pulls down the stomach to repair a hernia, there’s recoil force, and the esophagus can recoil back up and cause a recurrent hernia.”

In a retrospective study of patients who underwent pre-operative manometry and either open or laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, Gabbard and colleagues found a link between esophageal length and hernia recurrence.

Additionally, they found that the open Collis gastroplasty procedure helped decrease hernia recurrence.

While prospective studies are still needed to validate the study’s findings, Gabbard said the results can still serve as a guide for practicing GIs.

“As gastroenterologists, it’s important that we send our patients to the correct surgeons,” he said. “For a patient that has a shortened esophagus, send them to a surgeon that can offer the Collis gastroplasty.”

Reference :

Lal P, et al. Abstract 28. Presented at: American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 5-10, 2018; Philadelphia.

Disclosure: Gabbard reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

PHILADELPHIA — In this exclusive video, Scott Gabbard, MD, from the Cleveland Clinic, discusses a study presented by his team at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

They evaluated the rate of hiatal hernia recurrence after surgery and explored the relationship between hernia recurrence and esophageal length.

“What can happen after a hiatal hernia is the stomach comes up into the chest cavity, and the esophagus, over time, will shorten,” Gabbard told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “When the surgeon pulls down the stomach to repair a hernia, there’s recoil force, and the esophagus can recoil back up and cause a recurrent hernia.”

In a retrospective study of patients who underwent pre-operative manometry and either open or laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, Gabbard and colleagues found a link between esophageal length and hernia recurrence.

Additionally, they found that the open Collis gastroplasty procedure helped decrease hernia recurrence.

While prospective studies are still needed to validate the study’s findings, Gabbard said the results can still serve as a guide for practicing GIs.

“As gastroenterologists, it’s important that we send our patients to the correct surgeons,” he said. “For a patient that has a shortened esophagus, send them to a surgeon that can offer the Collis gastroplasty.”

Reference :

Lal P, et al. Abstract 28. Presented at: American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 5-10, 2018; Philadelphia.

Disclosure: Gabbard reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

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