Meeting News

Most multivitamin users sleep between 5 and 9 hours daily

Michael Grandner
Michael Grandner

Those who used multivitamins were much less likely to get less than 5 hours or more than 9 hours of sleep daily, according to findings recently presented at SLEEP 2018, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

“Many people are taking supplements in an effort to improve their health,” Michael A. Grandner, PhD, MTR, CBSM, director of the Sleep Health & Research Program at the University of Arizona School of Medicine, told Healio Family Medicine in an interview. “It is important to know if there are any correlations that suggest effects of some of these supplements on sleep.”

Researchers used data from 1,007 adults, including multivitamin use, sleep duration, insomnia and fatigue.

They found that after adjusting the data for age, BMI, education, income, overall health, perceived stress, race and sex, multivitamin use was linked to a lower likelihood of less than 5 hours of sleep (OR = 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7) and more than 9 hours of sleep (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1).

“This could mean that those with generally healthier sleep patterns are more likely to take a multivitamin or it could mean that something in those multivitamins actually helps regulate sleep,” Grandner said in the interview. “I suspect the former, since when you look at ‘all’ supplement use, it's pretty much the same pattern, suggesting it's not about the type of supplement but rather whether you're the kind of person who takes one.”

Researchers also found that any use of supplements was linked to a lower likelihood of very short sleep (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8), taking probiotics use was linked to higher fatigue scores (B = 7.4; 95% CI, 1.62-13.17) and taking vitamin B was linked to an increased likelihood of mild insomnia (OR = 2; 95% CI, 1-3.8).

Woman Sleeping
Those who used multivitamins were much less likely to get less than 5 hours or more than 9 hours of sleep daily, according to findings recently presented at SLEEP 2018, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.
 
Photo source: Shutterstock

“What was surprising was that there were no clear patterns that suggest that supplements really had anything to do with improving or worsening sleep. Overall, the only clear pattern was that people with generally healthier sleep patterns tended to take a supplement. However, there were some patterns that may be worth following up on, especially the unique finding with probiotics,” Grandner said. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Sanchez C, et al. Relationships between dietary supplement intake and sleep duration, insomnia and fatigue. Presented at: SLEEP, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies; June 2-6, 2018; Baltimore.

Disclosures: Healio Family Medicine was unable to confirm relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

 

Michael Grandner
Michael Grandner

Those who used multivitamins were much less likely to get less than 5 hours or more than 9 hours of sleep daily, according to findings recently presented at SLEEP 2018, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

“Many people are taking supplements in an effort to improve their health,” Michael A. Grandner, PhD, MTR, CBSM, director of the Sleep Health & Research Program at the University of Arizona School of Medicine, told Healio Family Medicine in an interview. “It is important to know if there are any correlations that suggest effects of some of these supplements on sleep.”

Researchers used data from 1,007 adults, including multivitamin use, sleep duration, insomnia and fatigue.

They found that after adjusting the data for age, BMI, education, income, overall health, perceived stress, race and sex, multivitamin use was linked to a lower likelihood of less than 5 hours of sleep (OR = 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7) and more than 9 hours of sleep (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1).

“This could mean that those with generally healthier sleep patterns are more likely to take a multivitamin or it could mean that something in those multivitamins actually helps regulate sleep,” Grandner said in the interview. “I suspect the former, since when you look at ‘all’ supplement use, it's pretty much the same pattern, suggesting it's not about the type of supplement but rather whether you're the kind of person who takes one.”

Researchers also found that any use of supplements was linked to a lower likelihood of very short sleep (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8), taking probiotics use was linked to higher fatigue scores (B = 7.4; 95% CI, 1.62-13.17) and taking vitamin B was linked to an increased likelihood of mild insomnia (OR = 2; 95% CI, 1-3.8).

Woman Sleeping
Those who used multivitamins were much less likely to get less than 5 hours or more than 9 hours of sleep daily, according to findings recently presented at SLEEP 2018, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.
 
Photo source: Shutterstock

“What was surprising was that there were no clear patterns that suggest that supplements really had anything to do with improving or worsening sleep. Overall, the only clear pattern was that people with generally healthier sleep patterns tended to take a supplement. However, there were some patterns that may be worth following up on, especially the unique finding with probiotics,” Grandner said. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Sanchez C, et al. Relationships between dietary supplement intake and sleep duration, insomnia and fatigue. Presented at: SLEEP, the Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies; June 2-6, 2018; Baltimore.

Disclosures: Healio Family Medicine was unable to confirm relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

 

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