USPSTF recommends against COPD screening in asymptomatic adults

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended against primary care screening for COPD in adults not showing symptoms suggestive of the disease, according to a draft recommendation statement.

This draft is in agreement with the Task Force’s 2008 screening recommendations on COPD.

“The Task Force found that there is no evidence that screening for COPD in adults without symptoms results in improved health outcomes. The most important step you can take to prevent COPD is to avoid smoking,” William Phillips, MD, MPH, Task Force member, said in a press release.

The USPSTF based their recommendation on evidence that showed COPD screenings prior to symptom development had no effect on treatment decision, morbidity or mortality.

According to the draft, while there are no harms in screening all adults, the costs associated with screening asymptomatic patients could be great.

Other organizations that support the USPSTF’s COPD recommendations include the American College of Physicians and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

The public is invited to comment on the recommendations through September 14, 2015, before the final version is published.

Reference:

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Draft recommendation statement. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Screening. Available at: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/draft-recommendation-statement159/chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-screening Accessed August 21, 2015.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended against primary care screening for COPD in adults not showing symptoms suggestive of the disease, according to a draft recommendation statement.

This draft is in agreement with the Task Force’s 2008 screening recommendations on COPD.

“The Task Force found that there is no evidence that screening for COPD in adults without symptoms results in improved health outcomes. The most important step you can take to prevent COPD is to avoid smoking,” William Phillips, MD, MPH, Task Force member, said in a press release.

The USPSTF based their recommendation on evidence that showed COPD screenings prior to symptom development had no effect on treatment decision, morbidity or mortality.

According to the draft, while there are no harms in screening all adults, the costs associated with screening asymptomatic patients could be great.

Other organizations that support the USPSTF’s COPD recommendations include the American College of Physicians and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

The public is invited to comment on the recommendations through September 14, 2015, before the final version is published.

Reference:

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Draft recommendation statement. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Screening. Available at: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/draft-recommendation-statement159/chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-screening Accessed August 21, 2015.