Most older patients say PCPs do not ask about vision

Preeti Malani
Preeti Malani

More than half of older patients surveyed said their primary care provider did not ask them about their vision, according to findings recently released from the National Poll on Healthy Aging.

According to researchers, the number of adults with vision impairment is expected to double over the next 3 decades.

“Older adults often have a long list of health concerns to discuss with their primary care provider. Difficulties with vision might not always come to mind,” Preeti Malani, MD, poll director and geriatrics specialist at the University of Michigan Medical School, said in a press release.

  • The survey included responses from 2,013 participants aged 50 to 80 years. Results included:
  • 58% said their primary health care provider did not ask about vision.
  • 27% said they had been diagnosed with cataracts, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma or macular degeneration.
  • 17% had they had their vision checked using an eye chart at a primary care visit.
  • 91% had an eye exam within 2 years of a PCP asking about their vision.

“Findings from this poll underscore the important role that primary care providers play in promoting eye health,” researchers wrote. “Those with diabetes, a history of eye disease, or lower household incomes were more likely to have had a conversation about vision with their primary care provider, suggesting that primary care providers may be more likely to discuss eye health with those known to be at high risk for eye conditions.” – by Janel Miller

Reference: University of Michigan. National Poll on Healthy Aging. www.healthyagingpoll.org. Accessed October 17, 2018.

Disclosures: Healio Family Medicine was unable to determine the authors’ relevant disclosures prior to publication.

Preeti Malani
Preeti Malani

More than half of older patients surveyed said their primary care provider did not ask them about their vision, according to findings recently released from the National Poll on Healthy Aging.

According to researchers, the number of adults with vision impairment is expected to double over the next 3 decades.

“Older adults often have a long list of health concerns to discuss with their primary care provider. Difficulties with vision might not always come to mind,” Preeti Malani, MD, poll director and geriatrics specialist at the University of Michigan Medical School, said in a press release.

  • The survey included responses from 2,013 participants aged 50 to 80 years. Results included:
  • 58% said their primary health care provider did not ask about vision.
  • 27% said they had been diagnosed with cataracts, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma or macular degeneration.
  • 17% had they had their vision checked using an eye chart at a primary care visit.
  • 91% had an eye exam within 2 years of a PCP asking about their vision.

“Findings from this poll underscore the important role that primary care providers play in promoting eye health,” researchers wrote. “Those with diabetes, a history of eye disease, or lower household incomes were more likely to have had a conversation about vision with their primary care provider, suggesting that primary care providers may be more likely to discuss eye health with those known to be at high risk for eye conditions.” – by Janel Miller

Reference: University of Michigan. National Poll on Healthy Aging. www.healthyagingpoll.org. Accessed October 17, 2018.

Disclosures: Healio Family Medicine was unable to determine the authors’ relevant disclosures prior to publication.