Top stories in hematology/oncology: FDA decisions on drugs for prostate cancer, hemophilia A; biannual MRIs more effective than mammography

Among the top stories in hematology and oncology this week were announcements that the FDA granted Rubraca its breakthrough therapy designation for some patients with prostate cancer and also approved Hemlibra for certain patients with hemophilia A.

Other popular stories included a study that concluded twice-a-year MRIs were more effective than mammograms in high-risk women, data that indicated e-cigarette use doubled the risk for myocardial infarctions and a review of the groundbreaking research in cancer immunotherapy that was recognized with this year’s Nobel Prizes in medicine. – by Janel Miller

FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation to Rubraca for prostate cancer

The FDA granted rucaparib breakthrough therapy designation for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/BRCA2-mutated, metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to the manufacturer. Read more.

FDA approves Hemlibra for hemophilia A without factor VIII inhibitors

The FDA expanded the indications for emicizumab-kxwh to include routine prophylaxis to prevent or reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes among patients with hemophilia A without factor VIII inhibitors. Read more.

Biannual MRI more effective than mammography for high-risk women

Biannual MRI outperformed annual mammography in the early detection of invasive breast cancer among a cohort of genomically stratified high-risk women, according to study results. Read more.

E-cigarette use doubles heart attack risk

Daily use of electronic cigarettes doubled a person’s risk for heart attack, according to an analysis of survey data collected by CDC. Read more.

Cancer immunotherapy pioneers win Nobel Prize

James P. Allison, PhD, chair of the department of immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Tasuku Honjo, MD, PhD, professor of immunology and genomic medicine at Kyoto University in Japan, have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their separate work developing immune-based cancer treatments. Read more.

Among the top stories in hematology and oncology this week were announcements that the FDA granted Rubraca its breakthrough therapy designation for some patients with prostate cancer and also approved Hemlibra for certain patients with hemophilia A.

Other popular stories included a study that concluded twice-a-year MRIs were more effective than mammograms in high-risk women, data that indicated e-cigarette use doubled the risk for myocardial infarctions and a review of the groundbreaking research in cancer immunotherapy that was recognized with this year’s Nobel Prizes in medicine. – by Janel Miller

FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation to Rubraca for prostate cancer

The FDA granted rucaparib breakthrough therapy designation for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/BRCA2-mutated, metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to the manufacturer. Read more.

FDA approves Hemlibra for hemophilia A without factor VIII inhibitors

The FDA expanded the indications for emicizumab-kxwh to include routine prophylaxis to prevent or reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes among patients with hemophilia A without factor VIII inhibitors. Read more.

Biannual MRI more effective than mammography for high-risk women

Biannual MRI outperformed annual mammography in the early detection of invasive breast cancer among a cohort of genomically stratified high-risk women, according to study results. Read more.

E-cigarette use doubles heart attack risk

Daily use of electronic cigarettes doubled a person’s risk for heart attack, according to an analysis of survey data collected by CDC. Read more.

Cancer immunotherapy pioneers win Nobel Prize

James P. Allison, PhD, chair of the department of immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Tasuku Honjo, MD, PhD, professor of immunology and genomic medicine at Kyoto University in Japan, have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their separate work developing immune-based cancer treatments. Read more.