In the Journals

Radiation-related cancer risk up to 153% higher in patients with obesity

Patients with obesity that underwent X-ray had a risk for radiation-related cancer that was up to 153% higher than other patients, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Radiological Protection.

“In the context of radiation protection, patients with obesity are receiving higher doses as a result of computed tomography and interventional procedures,” Saeed J. M. Alqahtani, BSc, MSc, of the medical imaging department at the University of Exeter, England,and colleagues wrote.

“However, in projection radiography, the dose to patients with obesity in clinical practice has yet to be reported,” they added.

Researchers analyzed projection radiography history in 630 patients aged between 18 to 83.2 years with BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher.

Alqahtani and colleagues found the 75th percentile of dose area product in patients with obesity and X-ray vs. patients with normal weight and X-ray was:

  • 604% higher in the abdomen (anteroposterior);
  • 657% higher in the lumbar spine (anteroposterior and lateral);
  • 200% higher in the cervical spine (anteroposterior and lateral);
  • 158.6% higher in the pelvis (anteroposterior); and
  • 133% higher in the chest (posteroanterior).

Researchers also estimated radiation-related lifetime cancer risk for patients with obesity is up to 153% higher than for adult patients with normal weight.

Study co-author Richard Welbourn, MB BS, MD, FRCS, a consultant of upper gastrointestinal and bariatric surgery at Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton, England, provided a clinical recommendation based on the findings.

Obesity 
Patients with obesity that underwent X-ray had a risk for radiation-related cancer that was up to 153% higher than other patients, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Radiological Protection.
Source:Shutterstock

"Patients should not be put off having the X-rays they need to investigate disease as they are often crucial in getting the right treatment,” he said in a release.

Karen Knapp, PhD, associate professor of musculoskeletal imaging at the University of Exeter, and another study co-author, outlined future related research paths.

“Although the risk of cancer from X-ray is very low, we urgently need more research in patients who are overweight and obese, so we can understand how to minimize doses in this group and feed into far more robust guidelines around radiation, in turn to minimize that risk,” she said in the release. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Patients with obesity that underwent X-ray had a risk for radiation-related cancer that was up to 153% higher than other patients, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Radiological Protection.

“In the context of radiation protection, patients with obesity are receiving higher doses as a result of computed tomography and interventional procedures,” Saeed J. M. Alqahtani, BSc, MSc, of the medical imaging department at the University of Exeter, England,and colleagues wrote.

“However, in projection radiography, the dose to patients with obesity in clinical practice has yet to be reported,” they added.

Researchers analyzed projection radiography history in 630 patients aged between 18 to 83.2 years with BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher.

Alqahtani and colleagues found the 75th percentile of dose area product in patients with obesity and X-ray vs. patients with normal weight and X-ray was:

  • 604% higher in the abdomen (anteroposterior);
  • 657% higher in the lumbar spine (anteroposterior and lateral);
  • 200% higher in the cervical spine (anteroposterior and lateral);
  • 158.6% higher in the pelvis (anteroposterior); and
  • 133% higher in the chest (posteroanterior).

Researchers also estimated radiation-related lifetime cancer risk for patients with obesity is up to 153% higher than for adult patients with normal weight.

Study co-author Richard Welbourn, MB BS, MD, FRCS, a consultant of upper gastrointestinal and bariatric surgery at Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton, England, provided a clinical recommendation based on the findings.

Obesity 
Patients with obesity that underwent X-ray had a risk for radiation-related cancer that was up to 153% higher than other patients, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Radiological Protection.
Source:Shutterstock

"Patients should not be put off having the X-rays they need to investigate disease as they are often crucial in getting the right treatment,” he said in a release.

Karen Knapp, PhD, associate professor of musculoskeletal imaging at the University of Exeter, and another study co-author, outlined future related research paths.

“Although the risk of cancer from X-ray is very low, we urgently need more research in patients who are overweight and obese, so we can understand how to minimize doses in this group and feed into far more robust guidelines around radiation, in turn to minimize that risk,” she said in the release. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.