Top stories in gastroenterology: Pure-Vu System effective in cleaning colons, virtual chromoendoscopy positive alternative to traditional

Among the top gastroenterology stories last week were a study that concluded the Pure-Vu System is a feasible option for cleaning colons during colonoscopies, and research that suggested virtual chromoendoscopy is as effective as traditional chromoendoscopy while also being easier, faster and more comfortable for patients.

Other highlights include a study that found comorbidities, and not age, should determine use of immunomodulator therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, a report that suggested clopidogrel decreases colorectal cancer risk, and research that described a non-invasive test that can diagnose celiac disease without biopsy.

Pure-Vu System feasible for in-procedure bowel cleansing

The Pure-Vu System was safe and effective in cleaning poorly prepared colons during colonoscopies, according to research published in Endoscopy. Read more.

Virtual chromoendoscopy easier, faster, more comfortable for patients

Virtual chromoendoscopy appeared to be as good as traditional chromoendoscopy at diagnosing dysplastic lesions while being quicker, easier and more comfortable for patients, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Read more.

Comorbidities, not age, linked to immunomodulator use in inflammatory bowel disease

Physicians should be careful when prescribing immunomodulator therapy to patients with inflammatory bowel disease who have higher comorbid status regardless of their age, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Read more.

Clopidogrel reduces colorectal cancer risk

Inhibiting platelets with clopidogrel, either alone or in combination with low-dose aspirin, helped reduce risk for colorectal cancer, according to research published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Read more.

Non-invasive test diagnoses celiac disease without biopsy in some patients

A non-invasive test can accurately diagnose celiac disease in some patients and could lead to a decreased need for endoscopic diagnostic tests in the population, according to research published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Read more.

 

Among the top gastroenterology stories last week were a study that concluded the Pure-Vu System is a feasible option for cleaning colons during colonoscopies, and research that suggested virtual chromoendoscopy is as effective as traditional chromoendoscopy while also being easier, faster and more comfortable for patients.

Other highlights include a study that found comorbidities, and not age, should determine use of immunomodulator therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, a report that suggested clopidogrel decreases colorectal cancer risk, and research that described a non-invasive test that can diagnose celiac disease without biopsy.

Pure-Vu System feasible for in-procedure bowel cleansing

The Pure-Vu System was safe and effective in cleaning poorly prepared colons during colonoscopies, according to research published in Endoscopy. Read more.

Virtual chromoendoscopy easier, faster, more comfortable for patients

Virtual chromoendoscopy appeared to be as good as traditional chromoendoscopy at diagnosing dysplastic lesions while being quicker, easier and more comfortable for patients, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Read more.

Comorbidities, not age, linked to immunomodulator use in inflammatory bowel disease

Physicians should be careful when prescribing immunomodulator therapy to patients with inflammatory bowel disease who have higher comorbid status regardless of their age, according to research published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Read more.

Clopidogrel reduces colorectal cancer risk

Inhibiting platelets with clopidogrel, either alone or in combination with low-dose aspirin, helped reduce risk for colorectal cancer, according to research published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Read more.

Non-invasive test diagnoses celiac disease without biopsy in some patients

A non-invasive test can accurately diagnose celiac disease in some patients and could lead to a decreased need for endoscopic diagnostic tests in the population, according to research published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Read more.