In the Journals

Regular primary care visits linked to better control of diabetes

Consistent primary care utilization is associated with bp and glycemic control among American Indian/Alaska native adults with diabetes, according to a recently published study.

“Coordinated patient-centered primary care can improve health outcomes for patients with [diabetes mellitus], and access to primary care providers can reduce emergency department use, hospitalizations, morbidity, mortality and cost,” Matthew D. Berman, PhD, of the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska, and colleagues wrote.

Researchers evaluated electronic health records of 2,138 American Indian and Alaska native adults with diabetes who received care between 1995 and 2010 to assess the effect of primary care utilization on glycemic and blood pressure control. Participants had an average age of 52 years and were predominantly female (60%), overweight (94%) or obese (three-fourths). High blood pressure and use of tobacco or smokeless tobacco was seen among more than half of participants and 22% were prescribed insulin.

Results demonstrated that participants who had regular primary care visits had an 89% increased probability of bp control (95% CI, 59%-118%) and 177% increased likelihood of glycemic control (95% CI, 123%-222%).

Berman and colleagues found an association between access/distance to providers and decreased primary care visits, with an increase of 10 miles to services resulting in a 3.7% drop in visits (95% CI, – 2.9% to – 4.6%). – by Casey Hower

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Consistent primary care utilization is associated with bp and glycemic control among American Indian/Alaska native adults with diabetes, according to a recently published study.

“Coordinated patient-centered primary care can improve health outcomes for patients with [diabetes mellitus], and access to primary care providers can reduce emergency department use, hospitalizations, morbidity, mortality and cost,” Matthew D. Berman, PhD, of the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska, and colleagues wrote.

Researchers evaluated electronic health records of 2,138 American Indian and Alaska native adults with diabetes who received care between 1995 and 2010 to assess the effect of primary care utilization on glycemic and blood pressure control. Participants had an average age of 52 years and were predominantly female (60%), overweight (94%) or obese (three-fourths). High blood pressure and use of tobacco or smokeless tobacco was seen among more than half of participants and 22% were prescribed insulin.

Results demonstrated that participants who had regular primary care visits had an 89% increased probability of bp control (95% CI, 59%-118%) and 177% increased likelihood of glycemic control (95% CI, 123%-222%).

Berman and colleagues found an association between access/distance to providers and decreased primary care visits, with an increase of 10 miles to services resulting in a 3.7% drop in visits (95% CI, – 2.9% to – 4.6%). – by Casey Hower

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.