Top stories in endocrinology: Marijuana use may improve insulin resistance, sexual difficulties undertreated among postmenopausal women

Among the top stories in endocrinology last week were findings that suggested fasting insulin levels may be reduced by more than half in adults with obesity who use marijuana and a study that found sexual difficulties are underreported and undertreated among postmenopausal women.

Other highlights included research that determined adults with diabetes who were underweight were more likely to develop dementia than those without either condition, a study that suggested better medication access is needed to address glycemic management disparity across income levels and a study that found children with type 1 diabetes were less likely to maintain recommended HbA1c targets if they frequently experienced turmoil with their parents and other family members.

Marijuana use may improve insulin resistance in adults with obesity

Fasting insulin levels may be reduced by more than half in adults with obesity who use marijuana compared with those who do not, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes. Read more.

Sexual difficulties underreported, undertreated among postmenopausal women

Many partnered, postmenopausal women report that they are not sexually active, with sexual functioning strongly related to poor physical health of the intimate partner or the women themselves, according to findings published in Menopause. Read more.

Probability of dementia diagnosis higher with diabetes, underweight

Japanese older adults with diabetes or a BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2 are more likely to develop dementia than those without either condition, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation. Read more.

Better medication access needed to address glycemic management disparity across income levels

Canadian adults with diabetes who have the lowest incomes have higher HbA1c levels compared with those with the highest incomes, but researchers argue that universal prescription access can lessen the discrepancy. Read more.

Parent-child relationship important in achieving HbA1c goals in pediatric type 1 diabetes

Children with type 1 diabetes are less likely to maintain recommended HbA1c targets if they frequently experience turmoil with their parents and other family members, according to findings published in Diabetic Medicine. Read more.

Among the top stories in endocrinology last week were findings that suggested fasting insulin levels may be reduced by more than half in adults with obesity who use marijuana and a study that found sexual difficulties are underreported and undertreated among postmenopausal women.

Other highlights included research that determined adults with diabetes who were underweight were more likely to develop dementia than those without either condition, a study that suggested better medication access is needed to address glycemic management disparity across income levels and a study that found children with type 1 diabetes were less likely to maintain recommended HbA1c targets if they frequently experienced turmoil with their parents and other family members.

Marijuana use may improve insulin resistance in adults with obesity

Fasting insulin levels may be reduced by more than half in adults with obesity who use marijuana compared with those who do not, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes. Read more.

Sexual difficulties underreported, undertreated among postmenopausal women

Many partnered, postmenopausal women report that they are not sexually active, with sexual functioning strongly related to poor physical health of the intimate partner or the women themselves, according to findings published in Menopause. Read more.

Probability of dementia diagnosis higher with diabetes, underweight

Japanese older adults with diabetes or a BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2 are more likely to develop dementia than those without either condition, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation. Read more.

Better medication access needed to address glycemic management disparity across income levels

Canadian adults with diabetes who have the lowest incomes have higher HbA1c levels compared with those with the highest incomes, but researchers argue that universal prescription access can lessen the discrepancy. Read more.

Parent-child relationship important in achieving HbA1c goals in pediatric type 1 diabetes

Children with type 1 diabetes are less likely to maintain recommended HbA1c targets if they frequently experience turmoil with their parents and other family members, according to findings published in Diabetic Medicine. Read more.