Meeting News

B vitamins may lower type 2 diabetes risk, intake order may impact onset

Researchers linked consumption of vitamins B2 and B6 to a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a study presented at Nutrition 2019.

A second study, also presented at Nutrition 2019, indicated that the order in which food is eaten may influence the onset of diabetes.

In the first study, Kim V.E. Braun, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands and colleagues analyzed certain pre-existing food and supplemental vitamin consumption data collected every 2 to 4 years from 8,141 health professionals with diabetes.

They found that those who consumed the highest amounts of vitamin B2 foods and supplements had a 10% lower risk for type 2 diabetes, while those who consumed the highest amounts of vitamin B6 foods and supplements had an 11% lower risk for type 2 diabetes. In addition, vitamin B12 was more likely to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes when it was primarily consumed as a supplement.

Diabetes Words 2019 
From Nutrition 2019: One study showed that consumption of vitamins B2 and B6 to a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, while another study showed the order in which food is eaten may influence the onset of diabetes.
Source:Adobe

Food order may matter

In the second study, Christiani Henry, MSc, PhD, of the Singapore Institutes for Clinical Sciences, and colleagues observed 16 healthy patients (13 men) as they ate green leafy vegetables, rice and chicken in various orders.

Researchers found that patients’ overall postprandial glucose response, incremental area under the curve for insulin and their gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels all lowered when patients ate vegetables first, then meat and then rice. Conversely, when the patients ate rice first, then vegetables, then meat, the overall postprandial glucose response appeared minimal.

"The order of food presentation has a great potential to alter the glycemic response of rice-based diets,” Henri and colleagues wrote in the abstract. “Our results provide a simple but effective way to reduce postprandial glucose and may help prevent the transition from prediabetics to diabetics.” – by Janel Miller

Resources:

Braun VE, et al. Methyl donor nutrient intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: Results from 3 large US cohorts.

Henry C, et al. Can the sequence of food presentation influence postprandial glycaemia?

Both presented at: Nutrition 2019; June 8-11; Baltimore.

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care was unable to confirm the authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers linked consumption of vitamins B2 and B6 to a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a study presented at Nutrition 2019.

A second study, also presented at Nutrition 2019, indicated that the order in which food is eaten may influence the onset of diabetes.

In the first study, Kim V.E. Braun, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands and colleagues analyzed certain pre-existing food and supplemental vitamin consumption data collected every 2 to 4 years from 8,141 health professionals with diabetes.

They found that those who consumed the highest amounts of vitamin B2 foods and supplements had a 10% lower risk for type 2 diabetes, while those who consumed the highest amounts of vitamin B6 foods and supplements had an 11% lower risk for type 2 diabetes. In addition, vitamin B12 was more likely to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes when it was primarily consumed as a supplement.

Diabetes Words 2019 
From Nutrition 2019: One study showed that consumption of vitamins B2 and B6 to a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, while another study showed the order in which food is eaten may influence the onset of diabetes.
Source:Adobe

Food order may matter

In the second study, Christiani Henry, MSc, PhD, of the Singapore Institutes for Clinical Sciences, and colleagues observed 16 healthy patients (13 men) as they ate green leafy vegetables, rice and chicken in various orders.

Researchers found that patients’ overall postprandial glucose response, incremental area under the curve for insulin and their gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels all lowered when patients ate vegetables first, then meat and then rice. Conversely, when the patients ate rice first, then vegetables, then meat, the overall postprandial glucose response appeared minimal.

"The order of food presentation has a great potential to alter the glycemic response of rice-based diets,” Henri and colleagues wrote in the abstract. “Our results provide a simple but effective way to reduce postprandial glucose and may help prevent the transition from prediabetics to diabetics.” – by Janel Miller

Resources:

Braun VE, et al. Methyl donor nutrient intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: Results from 3 large US cohorts.

Henry C, et al. Can the sequence of food presentation influence postprandial glycaemia?

Both presented at: Nutrition 2019; June 8-11; Baltimore.

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care was unable to confirm the authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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