In the Journals

Task force recommends diet, exercise programs in primary care to reduce diabetes

The Community Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that intervention programs that combine the promotion of both diet and physical activity be utilized in health care settings for patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to recently published data.

“The Task Force recommends the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs by health care systems, communities, and other implementers to provide counseling and support to clients identified as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote.

To determine the efficacy of combination programs at reducing the number of new type 2 diabetes diagnoses in health care settings, due to improvements in diet, exercise and weight, the researchers reviewed 53 studies published from 1991 to 2015.

Results from the systematic review demonstrated that combination programs were effective in reducing the number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes, as well as increased the likelihood of reversion to normoglycemia and decreases weight, blood glucose levels, BP and lipid levels, among adolescents and adults.

Additionally, the intervention programs were found to be cost-effective.

The programs were found to be applicable within a wide range of settings, including health care and community-based care settings within urban and rural areas, and were most effective among patients with abnormally elevated blood glucose levels, but who do not have type 2 diabetes.

Components of reviewed programs included:

  • at least 3 months of provider/patient interaction;
  • a mixture of counseling, coaching and extended support;
  • in-person, video or email sessions about diet and physical activity;
  • exercise and diet counselors, specializing in various different subspecialties, working with physicians, nurses and trained laypersons; 
  • counseling sessions, ranging in intensity, varying in length and group size;
  • personalized exercise and/or diet programs;
  • goals for weight-loss or exercise; and
  • follow-up sessions post program.

“Health care providers are usually the primary resource for persons newly diagnosed as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Providers need to be aware of the benefits of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs and of pertinent local programs offered by community centers or run by insurers or nonprofit of other private contractors,” the researchers concluded. – by Casey Hower

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The Community Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that intervention programs that combine the promotion of both diet and physical activity be utilized in health care settings for patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to recently published data.

“The Task Force recommends the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs by health care systems, communities, and other implementers to provide counseling and support to clients identified as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote.

To determine the efficacy of combination programs at reducing the number of new type 2 diabetes diagnoses in health care settings, due to improvements in diet, exercise and weight, the researchers reviewed 53 studies published from 1991 to 2015.

Results from the systematic review demonstrated that combination programs were effective in reducing the number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes, as well as increased the likelihood of reversion to normoglycemia and decreases weight, blood glucose levels, BP and lipid levels, among adolescents and adults.

Additionally, the intervention programs were found to be cost-effective.

The programs were found to be applicable within a wide range of settings, including health care and community-based care settings within urban and rural areas, and were most effective among patients with abnormally elevated blood glucose levels, but who do not have type 2 diabetes.

Components of reviewed programs included:

  • at least 3 months of provider/patient interaction;
  • a mixture of counseling, coaching and extended support;
  • in-person, video or email sessions about diet and physical activity;
  • exercise and diet counselors, specializing in various different subspecialties, working with physicians, nurses and trained laypersons; 
  • counseling sessions, ranging in intensity, varying in length and group size;
  • personalized exercise and/or diet programs;
  • goals for weight-loss or exercise; and
  • follow-up sessions post program.

“Health care providers are usually the primary resource for persons newly diagnosed as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Providers need to be aware of the benefits of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs and of pertinent local programs offered by community centers or run by insurers or nonprofit of other private contractors,” the researchers concluded. – by Casey Hower

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.