Top stories in cardiology: FDA clears injectable cardiac monitor, CMS to cover some patients’ ambulatory BP monitoring

Among the top stories in cardiology last week were the FDA’s clearance of an injectable cardiac monitor to identify unexplained syncope or suspected arrhythmia and CMS’ announcement that it would cover ambulatory BP monitoring in Medicare beneficiaries with suspected hypertension.

Other highlights included a study that found the use of ecstasy may increase the odds for valvular heart disease, research that suggested risk factor management may help prevent atrial fibrillation recurrence and a presentation at the Heart in Diabetes conference that suggested novel, pediatric-age based interventions geared towards preventing future CVD might provide a notable return on investment.

Injectable cardiac monitor receives FDA clearance

Biotronik announced that an injectable cardiac monitor to identify unexplained syncope or suspected arrhythmia has received FDA clearance. Read more.

CMS to cover ambulatory BP monitoring for patients with suspected hypertension

CMS has issued a decision memo stating that the evidence is sufficient for the coverage of ambulatory BP monitoring in Medicare beneficiaries with suspected white coat hypertension or masked hypertension. Read more.

Use of ecstasy, similar drugs may increase odds of valvular heart disease

The use of medications affecting serotonergic pathways was found to confer an increased risk for valvular heart disease, according to findings published in Heart. Read more.

Risk factor management can be ‘fourth’ pillar of atrial fibrillation treatment

Ablation does not always prevent recurrence of atrial fibrillation, nor do the established three pillars of atrial fibrillation management. Given that, at some institutions, clinicians are targeting the risk factors for recurrence, many of which are related to lifestyle. Read more.

Shift to health promotion needed to prevent cardiovascular disease

The global burden of CVD continues to increase and novel interventions that target the youngest children can make the biggest difference in preventing future disease for the lowest cost, according to a speaker at the Heart in Diabetes conference. Read more.

 

Among the top stories in cardiology last week were the FDA’s clearance of an injectable cardiac monitor to identify unexplained syncope or suspected arrhythmia and CMS’ announcement that it would cover ambulatory BP monitoring in Medicare beneficiaries with suspected hypertension.

Other highlights included a study that found the use of ecstasy may increase the odds for valvular heart disease, research that suggested risk factor management may help prevent atrial fibrillation recurrence and a presentation at the Heart in Diabetes conference that suggested novel, pediatric-age based interventions geared towards preventing future CVD might provide a notable return on investment.

Injectable cardiac monitor receives FDA clearance

Biotronik announced that an injectable cardiac monitor to identify unexplained syncope or suspected arrhythmia has received FDA clearance. Read more.

CMS to cover ambulatory BP monitoring for patients with suspected hypertension

CMS has issued a decision memo stating that the evidence is sufficient for the coverage of ambulatory BP monitoring in Medicare beneficiaries with suspected white coat hypertension or masked hypertension. Read more.

Use of ecstasy, similar drugs may increase odds of valvular heart disease

The use of medications affecting serotonergic pathways was found to confer an increased risk for valvular heart disease, according to findings published in Heart. Read more.

Risk factor management can be ‘fourth’ pillar of atrial fibrillation treatment

Ablation does not always prevent recurrence of atrial fibrillation, nor do the established three pillars of atrial fibrillation management. Given that, at some institutions, clinicians are targeting the risk factors for recurrence, many of which are related to lifestyle. Read more.

Shift to health promotion needed to prevent cardiovascular disease

The global burden of CVD continues to increase and novel interventions that target the youngest children can make the biggest difference in preventing future disease for the lowest cost, according to a speaker at the Heart in Diabetes conference. Read more.