Top stories in cardiology: exercise can decrease genetic risk for CVD, tea and pills preferred over exercise to control hypertension

Among the top stories in cardiology is a study finding that physical activity and fitness were inversely associated with incident CVD among patients from the general population and those with an elevated genetic risk for CVD. Also, an abstract presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Scientific Sessions found that adults are more inclined to take a daily pill or drink tea rather than exercise when controlling hypertension. Other stories include large disparities remain in total CVD burden among U.S. states, informal caregiving costs for CVD are projected to double by 2035, and patients who underwent CABG and were treated with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel had fewer 30-day adverse outcomes compared with those treated with aspirin.- by Jake Scott

Exercise can decrease genetic risk for CVD

Physical activity and fitness were inversely associated with incident CVD among patients from the general population and those with an elevated genetic risk for CVD, according to a study published in Circulation. Read More.

To control hypertension, adults prefer tea, pills over exercise

Adults asked about controlling hypertension said they are more inclined to take a daily pill or drink tea rather than exercise, according to results of an abstract presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions. Read More.

Disparities in CVD burden persist among US states

Despite marked improvements in CVD burden between 1990 and 2016, large disparities remain in total CVD burden among U.S. states, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. Read More.

Informal caregiving costs for CVD projected to double by 2035

The cost for informal caregiving of patients with CVD is estimated to increase from $61 billion in 2015 to $128 billion in 2035, raising the forecasted total CVD costs to $616 billion in 2015 and $1.2 trillion in 2035, according to an American Heart Association policy statement published in Circulation. Read More.

DAPT confers improved outcomes at 30 days for CABG

Patients who underwent CABG and were treated with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel had fewer 30-day adverse outcomes compared with those treated with aspirin alone, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology. Read More.

 

 

Among the top stories in cardiology is a study finding that physical activity and fitness were inversely associated with incident CVD among patients from the general population and those with an elevated genetic risk for CVD. Also, an abstract presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Scientific Sessions found that adults are more inclined to take a daily pill or drink tea rather than exercise when controlling hypertension. Other stories include large disparities remain in total CVD burden among U.S. states, informal caregiving costs for CVD are projected to double by 2035, and patients who underwent CABG and were treated with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel had fewer 30-day adverse outcomes compared with those treated with aspirin.- by Jake Scott

Exercise can decrease genetic risk for CVD

Physical activity and fitness were inversely associated with incident CVD among patients from the general population and those with an elevated genetic risk for CVD, according to a study published in Circulation. Read More.

To control hypertension, adults prefer tea, pills over exercise

Adults asked about controlling hypertension said they are more inclined to take a daily pill or drink tea rather than exercise, according to results of an abstract presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions. Read More.

Disparities in CVD burden persist among US states

Despite marked improvements in CVD burden between 1990 and 2016, large disparities remain in total CVD burden among U.S. states, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. Read More.

Informal caregiving costs for CVD projected to double by 2035

The cost for informal caregiving of patients with CVD is estimated to increase from $61 billion in 2015 to $128 billion in 2035, raising the forecasted total CVD costs to $616 billion in 2015 and $1.2 trillion in 2035, according to an American Heart Association policy statement published in Circulation. Read More.

DAPT confers improved outcomes at 30 days for CABG

Patients who underwent CABG and were treated with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel had fewer 30-day adverse outcomes compared with those treated with aspirin alone, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology. Read More.