Top stories in cardiology: Alirocumab price reduced, artificially sweetened beverages may increase stroke risk

Among the top cardiology stories last week were an announcement by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi that they reduced the price of alirocumab by 60% and a study that found patients who had a high intake of artificially sweetened beverages had increased risks for stroke, coronary heart disease, small artery occlusion ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality.

Other highlights included findings that suggested common triggers for atrial fibrillation are modifiable and included caffeine, alcohol, lack of sleep and exercise, research that indicated that metabolites were associated with myocardial ischemia and a study that found patients with atherosclerotic CVD who had low adherence to statin therapy had an increased risk for mortality compared with those who were more adherent to the therapy.

Alirocumab price reduced by 60%

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi announced that they have reduced the price of alirocumab to treat patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or atherosclerotic CVD who require additional low-density lipoprotein lowering. Read more.

Artificially sweetened beverages increase risk for stroke in women

Patients who had a high intake of artificially sweetened beverages had increased risks for stroke, coronary heart disease, small artery occlusion ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality, according to a study published in Stroke. Read more.

Common triggers for atrial fibrillation episodes modifiable

Common triggers for atrial fibrillation included caffeine, alcohol, lack of sleep and exercise, according to a study published in HeartRhythm. Read more.

Several metabolites may be associated with myocardial ischemia

Five metabolites were identified within 2 hours of a stress test in patients with myocardial ischemia, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. Read more.

Low adherence to statin therapy increases risk for mortality

Patients with atherosclerotic CVD who had low adherence to statin therapy had an increased risk for mortality compared with those who were more adherent to the therapy, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. Read more.

Among the top cardiology stories last week were an announcement by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi that they reduced the price of alirocumab by 60% and a study that found patients who had a high intake of artificially sweetened beverages had increased risks for stroke, coronary heart disease, small artery occlusion ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality.

Other highlights included findings that suggested common triggers for atrial fibrillation are modifiable and included caffeine, alcohol, lack of sleep and exercise, research that indicated that metabolites were associated with myocardial ischemia and a study that found patients with atherosclerotic CVD who had low adherence to statin therapy had an increased risk for mortality compared with those who were more adherent to the therapy.

Alirocumab price reduced by 60%

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi announced that they have reduced the price of alirocumab to treat patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or atherosclerotic CVD who require additional low-density lipoprotein lowering. Read more.

Artificially sweetened beverages increase risk for stroke in women

Patients who had a high intake of artificially sweetened beverages had increased risks for stroke, coronary heart disease, small artery occlusion ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality, according to a study published in Stroke. Read more.

Common triggers for atrial fibrillation episodes modifiable

Common triggers for atrial fibrillation included caffeine, alcohol, lack of sleep and exercise, according to a study published in HeartRhythm. Read more.

Several metabolites may be associated with myocardial ischemia

Five metabolites were identified within 2 hours of a stress test in patients with myocardial ischemia, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. Read more.

Low adherence to statin therapy increases risk for mortality

Patients with atherosclerotic CVD who had low adherence to statin therapy had an increased risk for mortality compared with those who were more adherent to the therapy, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. Read more.