Meeting News

More allergists reporting barriers to performing oral food challenges

Justin Greiwe
Justin C. Greiwe

The number of allergists that reported obstacles in conducting oral food challenges increased during the past decade, according to findings presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting.

Justin C. Greiwe, MD, FAAAAI, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati, and colleagues analyzed recent survey responses from 546 allergists and compared them to a similar survey conducted 10 years ago. Some of their findings include:

  • 65.6% now report not enough time vs. 55% in 2009.
  • 59.6% now report not enough staff vs. 44.3% in 2009.
  • 55.3% now report not enough office space vs. 27.1% in 2009.
  • 16.9% now report not enough experience vs. 11.5% in 2009.

“Overall, 64% of allergists surveyed in 2018 and 2019 said they performed five or fewer oral food challenges a month,” Greiwe told Healio Primary Care Today in an interview.

“The benefits of food challenges can be far reaching and impactful with improved quality of life, clarifying unnecessary dietary restrictions, increased social interactions, and reducing fear and anxiety,” he added. “The demand for these challenges is only going to increase, as the number of patients with potential food allergies increases. It is important for allergists to have the confidence and experience to meet these demands.”

Greiwe suggested resources such as the AAAAI and American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology websites and attendance at those societies’ annual meetings for allergists to strengthen their skill set. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Greiwe, JC, et al. “Trends in oral food challenge practices among allergists in the United States: A workgroup report.” Presented at: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting; Feb. 22-25, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care Today was unable to determine the authors’ relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

Justin Greiwe
Justin C. Greiwe

The number of allergists that reported obstacles in conducting oral food challenges increased during the past decade, according to findings presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting.

Justin C. Greiwe, MD, FAAAAI, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati, and colleagues analyzed recent survey responses from 546 allergists and compared them to a similar survey conducted 10 years ago. Some of their findings include:

  • 65.6% now report not enough time vs. 55% in 2009.
  • 59.6% now report not enough staff vs. 44.3% in 2009.
  • 55.3% now report not enough office space vs. 27.1% in 2009.
  • 16.9% now report not enough experience vs. 11.5% in 2009.

“Overall, 64% of allergists surveyed in 2018 and 2019 said they performed five or fewer oral food challenges a month,” Greiwe told Healio Primary Care Today in an interview.

“The benefits of food challenges can be far reaching and impactful with improved quality of life, clarifying unnecessary dietary restrictions, increased social interactions, and reducing fear and anxiety,” he added. “The demand for these challenges is only going to increase, as the number of patients with potential food allergies increases. It is important for allergists to have the confidence and experience to meet these demands.”

Greiwe suggested resources such as the AAAAI and American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology websites and attendance at those societies’ annual meetings for allergists to strengthen their skill set. – by Janel Miller

Reference:

Greiwe, JC, et al. “Trends in oral food challenge practices among allergists in the United States: A workgroup report.” Presented at: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting; Feb. 22-25, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care Today was unable to determine the authors’ relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

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