In the Journals

Allergy experts set the record straight on flu shots for patients with egg sensitivity

John Kelso
John M. Kelso

New data have affirmed what the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology said has been known for several years: There are no special precautions needed to dispense the influenza vaccine in people with egg allergy.

“Although the previous allergy practice parameter had concluded that patients with egg allergy of any severity could safely receive the injectable influenza vaccine without any special precautions, other professional and governmental organizations that issue annual guidelines on influenza vaccination had continued to call for special precautions, such as an extended observation period after immunization or referral to an allergy clinic,” John M. Kelso, MD, division of allergy, asthma and immunology at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego, told Healio Family Medicine.

Matthew Greenhawt

“We want health care providers and people with egg allergy to know there is no need to ask this question anymore, and no need to take any special precautions,” Matthew Greenhawt, MD, chair of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) food allergy committee, added in a press release. “The overwhelming evidence since 2011 has shown that a flu shot poses no greater risk to those with egg allergy than those without.”

Researchers added that since the last ACAAI practice parameter in 2013 on this topic, 31 studies involving 5,270 patients have been conducted. Based on all available data, researchers provided the following “strong” recommendations:

  • Influenza vaccines should be given to persons with egg allergy of any severity, just as they would be to individuals without egg allergy.
  • Live-attenuated influenza vaccine may be dispensed to individuals with egg allergy of any severity in the age group for which it is approved (aged 2 to 49 years), in particular, seasons and countries and seasons when live-attenuated influenza vaccine is recommended as an agent.
  • No special precautions beyond those recommended for providing any vaccine to any patient are necessary for administration of influenza vaccine to persons allergic to eggs.

Egg allergy affects as many as 2% of children in the U.S., according to researchers.– by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Kelso reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a list of the other authors relevant financial disclosures.

John Kelso
John M. Kelso

New data have affirmed what the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology said has been known for several years: There are no special precautions needed to dispense the influenza vaccine in people with egg allergy.

“Although the previous allergy practice parameter had concluded that patients with egg allergy of any severity could safely receive the injectable influenza vaccine without any special precautions, other professional and governmental organizations that issue annual guidelines on influenza vaccination had continued to call for special precautions, such as an extended observation period after immunization or referral to an allergy clinic,” John M. Kelso, MD, division of allergy, asthma and immunology at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego, told Healio Family Medicine.

Matthew Greenhawt

“We want health care providers and people with egg allergy to know there is no need to ask this question anymore, and no need to take any special precautions,” Matthew Greenhawt, MD, chair of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) food allergy committee, added in a press release. “The overwhelming evidence since 2011 has shown that a flu shot poses no greater risk to those with egg allergy than those without.”

Researchers added that since the last ACAAI practice parameter in 2013 on this topic, 31 studies involving 5,270 patients have been conducted. Based on all available data, researchers provided the following “strong” recommendations:

  • Influenza vaccines should be given to persons with egg allergy of any severity, just as they would be to individuals without egg allergy.
  • Live-attenuated influenza vaccine may be dispensed to individuals with egg allergy of any severity in the age group for which it is approved (aged 2 to 49 years), in particular, seasons and countries and seasons when live-attenuated influenza vaccine is recommended as an agent.
  • No special precautions beyond those recommended for providing any vaccine to any patient are necessary for administration of influenza vaccine to persons allergic to eggs.

Egg allergy affects as many as 2% of children in the U.S., according to researchers.– by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Kelso reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a list of the other authors relevant financial disclosures.