Meeting News

Continuous glucose monitoring preferred by teens, improves HbA1C compared to finger sticks

SAN FRANCISCO — Teenagers and young adults with type 1 diabetes preferred using a continuous glucose monitor instead of finger sticks, and the monitor’s use resulted in lower HbA1c levels, according to findings presented at the American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions.

“Glycemic control is suboptimal in the overwhelming majority of teens and young adults with type 1 diabetes, yet many do not embrace [continuous glucose monitoring] technology like their adult counterparts,” Lori M. Laffel, MD, MPH, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, said during a press conference.

Researchers reviewed HbA1c levels of 142 patients, half of them female and all aged 14 to 24 years, who had been randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to use continuous glucose monitoring or finger sticks for 6 months.

Laffel and colleagues found that at study’s end, continuous glucose monitoring users were more satisfied than finger stick users (P = .003) and also had a –0.4% decrease in average HbA1c level (P = .01).

For more Healio coverage of this study, please click here. – by Janel Miller and Phil Neuffer

Reference:

Laffel L, et al. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Intervention in Teens and Young Adults (CITY) — Primary Study Results. Presented at: American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions; June 7-11, San Francisco.

Disclosures: Dexcom supplied the devices used in the trial. Laffel reports she has served as a consultant for Astra Zeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Convatec, Dexcom, Eli Lilly, Insulet, Janssen, Merck, Novo Nordisk, Roche and Sanofi.

SAN FRANCISCO — Teenagers and young adults with type 1 diabetes preferred using a continuous glucose monitor instead of finger sticks, and the monitor’s use resulted in lower HbA1c levels, according to findings presented at the American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions.

“Glycemic control is suboptimal in the overwhelming majority of teens and young adults with type 1 diabetes, yet many do not embrace [continuous glucose monitoring] technology like their adult counterparts,” Lori M. Laffel, MD, MPH, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, said during a press conference.

Researchers reviewed HbA1c levels of 142 patients, half of them female and all aged 14 to 24 years, who had been randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to use continuous glucose monitoring or finger sticks for 6 months.

Laffel and colleagues found that at study’s end, continuous glucose monitoring users were more satisfied than finger stick users (P = .003) and also had a –0.4% decrease in average HbA1c level (P = .01).

For more Healio coverage of this study, please click here. – by Janel Miller and Phil Neuffer

Reference:

Laffel L, et al. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Intervention in Teens and Young Adults (CITY) — Primary Study Results. Presented at: American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions; June 7-11, San Francisco.

Disclosures: Dexcom supplied the devices used in the trial. Laffel reports she has served as a consultant for Astra Zeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Convatec, Dexcom, Eli Lilly, Insulet, Janssen, Merck, Novo Nordisk, Roche and Sanofi.