USPSTF: Screen adults, but not children, for illicit drug use

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently issued its first draft recommendation that specifically encouraged primary care clinicians to screen all adults for illicit drug use, including nonmedical uses of prescription drugs.

The task force also stated that there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation on whether teenagers should be screened for illicit drug use.

 
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently issued its first draft recommendation that specifically encouraged primary care clinicians to screen all adults for illicit drug use, including nonmedical uses of prescription drugs.The task force also stated that there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation on whether teenagers should be screened for illicit drug use.

Source: Shutterstock

Neither recommendation applies to patients with a current physician-diagnosed drug use disorder or those referred to or presently undergoing drug use treatment, according to the USPSTF.

The new draft statement and evidence review has been posted for public comment on the USPSTF website, at www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org. Input will be accepted through Sept. 9, 2019, at www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/tfcomment.htm.

“Illicit drug use can have a devastating impact on individuals and families,” Karina Davidson, PhD, MASc, task force co-vice chair and senior vice president of research at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York, said in a press release. “Clinicians can help by screening their adult patients and connecting people who use illicit drugs to the care they need to get better.”

The task force suggested clinicians use the following tools to apply the draft recommendations:

National Institute on Drug Abuse:

  • Screening and Assessment Tools Chart. https://www.drugabuse.gov/nidamed-medical-health-professionals/screening-tools-resources/chart-screening-tools
  • Screening for Drug Use in General Medical Settings: A Resource Guide for Providers. https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/resource_guide.pdf
  • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. A Guide to Substance Abuse Services for Primary Care Clinicians: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64820

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration:

  • Finding Quality Treatment for Substance Use Disorder. https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/pep18-treatment-loc.pdf
  • Health Resources and Services Administration Center for Integrated Health Solutions. Substance Use Disorder and Pregnancy. https://www.integration.samhsa.gov/about-us/integration-edge/substance-use-disorder-and-pregnancy

Data indicate that about 50% to 86% of pediatricians routinely screen their teen-aged patients for substance use, with most of these doctors using their clinical impressions rather than one of these and other validated screening tools, according to the USPSTF. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care was unable to determine the authors relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.

 

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently issued its first draft recommendation that specifically encouraged primary care clinicians to screen all adults for illicit drug use, including nonmedical uses of prescription drugs.

The task force also stated that there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation on whether teenagers should be screened for illicit drug use.

 
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently issued its first draft recommendation that specifically encouraged primary care clinicians to screen all adults for illicit drug use, including nonmedical uses of prescription drugs.The task force also stated that there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation on whether teenagers should be screened for illicit drug use.

Source: Shutterstock

Neither recommendation applies to patients with a current physician-diagnosed drug use disorder or those referred to or presently undergoing drug use treatment, according to the USPSTF.

The new draft statement and evidence review has been posted for public comment on the USPSTF website, at www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org. Input will be accepted through Sept. 9, 2019, at www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/tfcomment.htm.

“Illicit drug use can have a devastating impact on individuals and families,” Karina Davidson, PhD, MASc, task force co-vice chair and senior vice president of research at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York, said in a press release. “Clinicians can help by screening their adult patients and connecting people who use illicit drugs to the care they need to get better.”

The task force suggested clinicians use the following tools to apply the draft recommendations:

National Institute on Drug Abuse:

  • Screening and Assessment Tools Chart. https://www.drugabuse.gov/nidamed-medical-health-professionals/screening-tools-resources/chart-screening-tools
  • Screening for Drug Use in General Medical Settings: A Resource Guide for Providers. https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/resource_guide.pdf
  • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. A Guide to Substance Abuse Services for Primary Care Clinicians: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64820

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration:

  • Finding Quality Treatment for Substance Use Disorder. https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/pep18-treatment-loc.pdf
  • Health Resources and Services Administration Center for Integrated Health Solutions. Substance Use Disorder and Pregnancy. https://www.integration.samhsa.gov/about-us/integration-edge/substance-use-disorder-and-pregnancy

Data indicate that about 50% to 86% of pediatricians routinely screen their teen-aged patients for substance use, with most of these doctors using their clinical impressions rather than one of these and other validated screening tools, according to the USPSTF. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Healio Primary Care was unable to determine the authors relevant financial disclosures prior to publication.