In the Journals

CDC: Smoking rate among US adults reaches all-time low

In 2017, 14% of adults reported cigarette smoking “every day” or “some day”  — the lowest level ever recorded, down from 15.5% in 2016, and a 67% decrease since 1965, according to a report in MMWR.

The CDC also observed a “particularly notable decline” among young adults in recent years: about 10% of young adults aged 18 to 24 years smoked cigarettes in 2017, down from 13% in 2016.

Researchers used the 2017 National Health Interview Survey for their analysis, which also showed one in five adults still used some kind of tobacco product in 2017.

“Although cigarette smoking among U.S. adults has declined considerably, tobacco products have evolved in recent years to include various combustible, noncombustible, and electronic products,” Teresa W. Wang, PhD, Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, and colleagues wrote.

According to a CDC press release, smoking cigarettes and other combustible tobacco products causes 480,000 deaths each year, making it still the most common preventable cause of death and disease in the United States.

“This new all-time low in cigarette smoking among U.S. adults is a tremendous public health accomplishment — and it demonstrates the importance of continued proven strategies to reduce smoking,” CDC Director Robert Redfield, MD, said in the press release. “Despite this progress, work remains to reduce the harmful health effects of tobacco use.”

National Cancer Institute Director Norman E. Sharpless, MD, put the impact of cigarette smoking into some historical perspective.

“For more than half a century, cigarette smoking has been the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Eliminating smoking in America would, over time, eliminate about one-third of all cancer deaths,” he said in the press release.

Other survey results showed tobacco use was highest among people who were:

  • uninsured (31%), insured by Medicaid (28.2%), or received some other public insurance (26.8%);
  • non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native (29.8%), multiracial (27.4%), white (21.4%), or black adults (20.1%);
  • lesbian, gay, or bisexual adults (27.3%);
  • widowed, separated or divorced (23.1%); and
  • Single, never married, or not living with a partner (21%).

The use of any tobacco product was highest among those adults who had a:

“The persistent disparities in adult smoking prevalence described in this report emphasize the need for further research to accelerate reductions in tobacco use among all Americans,” Sharpless said.

Smoking 
In 2017, 14% of adults reported cigarette smoking in the last 30 days — the lowest level ever recorded, down from 15.5% in 2016, and a 67% decrease since 1965, according to a report in MMWR.
Source:Shutterstock

As a courtesy to its readers, and in advance of the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 15, some of Healio’s coverage of research into smoking cessation can be found below. – by Janel Miller

Smokers endorse metabolism-informed care for smoking cessation

Metabolism-informed care — a treatment strategy that matches normal metabolizers with a non-nicotine-based therapy such as Chantix and slow nicotine metabolizers with nicotine replacement therapy patch — was an acceptable option for patients who wanted to stop smoking, according to findings published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research. Read more.

Personalized invite increases smoking cessation attendance

Sending a personalized risk letter and invitation effectively increased attendance to Stop Smoking Services in the United Kingdom, according to recent findings. Read more.

Patient navigation, financial incentives improve smoking cessation rates

A multicomponent intervention that included patient navigation and financial incentives for biochemically confirmed smoking cessation significantly increased rates of smoking cessation among adult smokers, according to findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Read more.

'Cold turkey,' other methods effective for smoking cessation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

By using the cold turkey and other smoking cessation methods, patients with inflammatory bowel disease were more likely to successfully quit smoking, according to a poster presented at an Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Disease meeting. Read more.

Twitter, CDC ads effective at helping smokers quit

A Twitter account that shared daily automated messages and encouraged group communication, was twice as likely to help smokers quit than nicotine patches and government websites alone, according to data published in Tobacco Control. Read more.

Low-dose CT screening program may influence smoking behavior

Patients who participated in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT achieved a greater smoking cessation rate after a year than those who did not participate in the program, according to study findings presented at the American Thoracic Society Annual Meeting. Read more.

Lack of cessation program knowledge may keep smokers from quitting

The extent of Medicaid coverage for smoking-cessation medications may be a major barrier in getting low-income people to stop smoking, according to research published in Preventing Chronic Disease. Read more.

Hookah 
“Although cigarette smoking among U.S. adults has declined considerably, tobacco products have evolved in recent years to include various combustible, noncombustible, and electronic products,” Teresa W. Wang, PhD, Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, and colleagues wrote.

Source:Adobe

E-cigarette use unlikely to help smoking cessation

Abstinence from tobacco was less likely in cigarette smokers who used e-cigarettes after being discharged from the hospital, according to findings published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

Weight concerns affect women's attempts to quit smoking

Smokers who think that tobacco helps control their weight are less likely to be affected by anti-smoking policies, compared with those who do not believe it controls weight, according to recently published data. Read more.

Researchers recommend varenicline for smoking cessation in patients with HIV

Adding varenicline to individualized counseling was a safe and effective way for patients with HIV to quit smoking cigarettes, according to a recent randomized controlled trial in France. Read more.

Disclosures: Redfield is director of the CDC. Sharpless is director of the National Cancer Institute. None of the authors reported any relevant financial disclosures.

Editor's note: This story has been been updated to reflect a revision to the original source press release.

In 2017, 14% of adults reported cigarette smoking “every day” or “some day”  — the lowest level ever recorded, down from 15.5% in 2016, and a 67% decrease since 1965, according to a report in MMWR.

The CDC also observed a “particularly notable decline” among young adults in recent years: about 10% of young adults aged 18 to 24 years smoked cigarettes in 2017, down from 13% in 2016.

Researchers used the 2017 National Health Interview Survey for their analysis, which also showed one in five adults still used some kind of tobacco product in 2017.

“Although cigarette smoking among U.S. adults has declined considerably, tobacco products have evolved in recent years to include various combustible, noncombustible, and electronic products,” Teresa W. Wang, PhD, Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, and colleagues wrote.

According to a CDC press release, smoking cigarettes and other combustible tobacco products causes 480,000 deaths each year, making it still the most common preventable cause of death and disease in the United States.

“This new all-time low in cigarette smoking among U.S. adults is a tremendous public health accomplishment — and it demonstrates the importance of continued proven strategies to reduce smoking,” CDC Director Robert Redfield, MD, said in the press release. “Despite this progress, work remains to reduce the harmful health effects of tobacco use.”

National Cancer Institute Director Norman E. Sharpless, MD, put the impact of cigarette smoking into some historical perspective.

“For more than half a century, cigarette smoking has been the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Eliminating smoking in America would, over time, eliminate about one-third of all cancer deaths,” he said in the press release.

Other survey results showed tobacco use was highest among people who were:

  • uninsured (31%), insured by Medicaid (28.2%), or received some other public insurance (26.8%);
  • non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native (29.8%), multiracial (27.4%), white (21.4%), or black adults (20.1%);
  • lesbian, gay, or bisexual adults (27.3%);
  • widowed, separated or divorced (23.1%); and
  • Single, never married, or not living with a partner (21%).

The use of any tobacco product was highest among those adults who had a:

“The persistent disparities in adult smoking prevalence described in this report emphasize the need for further research to accelerate reductions in tobacco use among all Americans,” Sharpless said.

Smoking 
In 2017, 14% of adults reported cigarette smoking in the last 30 days — the lowest level ever recorded, down from 15.5% in 2016, and a 67% decrease since 1965, according to a report in MMWR.
Source:Shutterstock

As a courtesy to its readers, and in advance of the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 15, some of Healio’s coverage of research into smoking cessation can be found below. – by Janel Miller

Smokers endorse metabolism-informed care for smoking cessation

Metabolism-informed care — a treatment strategy that matches normal metabolizers with a non-nicotine-based therapy such as Chantix and slow nicotine metabolizers with nicotine replacement therapy patch — was an acceptable option for patients who wanted to stop smoking, according to findings published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research. Read more.

Personalized invite increases smoking cessation attendance

Sending a personalized risk letter and invitation effectively increased attendance to Stop Smoking Services in the United Kingdom, according to recent findings. Read more.

PAGE BREAK

Patient navigation, financial incentives improve smoking cessation rates

A multicomponent intervention that included patient navigation and financial incentives for biochemically confirmed smoking cessation significantly increased rates of smoking cessation among adult smokers, according to findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Read more.

'Cold turkey,' other methods effective for smoking cessation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

By using the cold turkey and other smoking cessation methods, patients with inflammatory bowel disease were more likely to successfully quit smoking, according to a poster presented at an Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Disease meeting. Read more.

Twitter, CDC ads effective at helping smokers quit

A Twitter account that shared daily automated messages and encouraged group communication, was twice as likely to help smokers quit than nicotine patches and government websites alone, according to data published in Tobacco Control. Read more.

Low-dose CT screening program may influence smoking behavior

Patients who participated in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT achieved a greater smoking cessation rate after a year than those who did not participate in the program, according to study findings presented at the American Thoracic Society Annual Meeting. Read more.

Lack of cessation program knowledge may keep smokers from quitting

The extent of Medicaid coverage for smoking-cessation medications may be a major barrier in getting low-income people to stop smoking, according to research published in Preventing Chronic Disease. Read more.

Hookah 
“Although cigarette smoking among U.S. adults has declined considerably, tobacco products have evolved in recent years to include various combustible, noncombustible, and electronic products,” Teresa W. Wang, PhD, Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, and colleagues wrote.

Source:Adobe

E-cigarette use unlikely to help smoking cessation

Abstinence from tobacco was less likely in cigarette smokers who used e-cigarettes after being discharged from the hospital, according to findings published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

Weight concerns affect women's attempts to quit smoking

Smokers who think that tobacco helps control their weight are less likely to be affected by anti-smoking policies, compared with those who do not believe it controls weight, according to recently published data. Read more.

Researchers recommend varenicline for smoking cessation in patients with HIV

Adding varenicline to individualized counseling was a safe and effective way for patients with HIV to quit smoking cigarettes, according to a recent randomized controlled trial in France. Read more.

Disclosures: Redfield is director of the CDC. Sharpless is director of the National Cancer Institute. None of the authors reported any relevant financial disclosures.

Editor's note: This story has been been updated to reflect a revision to the original source press release.