In the Journals

Alzheimer’s drug may help treat opioid addiction

Galantamine may also someday help treat opioid addiction, according to results published in The American Journal on Addictions.

“Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, was found in a randomized clinical trial to reduce cocaine use among methadone-maintained individuals who were also cocaine dependent. Because of the potential of galantamine to reduce multiple drugs of abuse, it may also reduce opioid use,” Kathleen M. Carroll, PhD, of the department of psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

To test their theory, researchers randomly assigned 120 patients (mean age, 38.36 years; 67% men; 52% white) in an approximate 1:1:1:1 ratio to galantamine plus two doses of cognitive behavioral therapy; galantamine; placebo and computerized CBT consisting of interactive exercises quizzes and video vignettes; or placebo. All patients received 8 mg of an extended-release version of galantamine daily.

Carroll and colleagues reported that there was a “significant main effect” in patients who received galantamine vs. placebo regarding the percent of urine specimens that tested negative for opioids, both during treatment (77% vs. 62%; P = .027) and throughout a 6month followup (81% vs. 59%, P = .001). Researchers also found that those who received placebo provided the first opioid-positive urine specimen sooner than participants who received galantamine (median day, 15 vs. 53; P = .02).

Pill bottle knocked over 
Galantamine may also someday help treat opioid addiction, according to results published in The American Journal on Addictions.

Source:Adobe

“Our findings are consistent with human trials indicating galantamine-associated reductions in heavy alcohol use and cigarette use,” Carroll and colleagues wrote. “Further, in preclinical studies, cholinesterase inhibitors reduced selfadministration of cocaine, opioids and nicotine. These findings led us to hypothesize that galantamine, or more generally cholinesterase inhibitors, have an antiaddictive effect through a common mechanism shared by different drugs of abuse.”

Researchers added that their findings must be replicated in upcoming trials before widespread adoption of the strategy studied to treat opioid addiction. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Carroll reports she is a member of the company that made the computerized CBT used in this study. The other researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Galantamine may also someday help treat opioid addiction, according to results published in The American Journal on Addictions.

“Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, was found in a randomized clinical trial to reduce cocaine use among methadone-maintained individuals who were also cocaine dependent. Because of the potential of galantamine to reduce multiple drugs of abuse, it may also reduce opioid use,” Kathleen M. Carroll, PhD, of the department of psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

To test their theory, researchers randomly assigned 120 patients (mean age, 38.36 years; 67% men; 52% white) in an approximate 1:1:1:1 ratio to galantamine plus two doses of cognitive behavioral therapy; galantamine; placebo and computerized CBT consisting of interactive exercises quizzes and video vignettes; or placebo. All patients received 8 mg of an extended-release version of galantamine daily.

Carroll and colleagues reported that there was a “significant main effect” in patients who received galantamine vs. placebo regarding the percent of urine specimens that tested negative for opioids, both during treatment (77% vs. 62%; P = .027) and throughout a 6month followup (81% vs. 59%, P = .001). Researchers also found that those who received placebo provided the first opioid-positive urine specimen sooner than participants who received galantamine (median day, 15 vs. 53; P = .02).

Pill bottle knocked over 
Galantamine may also someday help treat opioid addiction, according to results published in The American Journal on Addictions.

Source:Adobe

“Our findings are consistent with human trials indicating galantamine-associated reductions in heavy alcohol use and cigarette use,” Carroll and colleagues wrote. “Further, in preclinical studies, cholinesterase inhibitors reduced selfadministration of cocaine, opioids and nicotine. These findings led us to hypothesize that galantamine, or more generally cholinesterase inhibitors, have an antiaddictive effect through a common mechanism shared by different drugs of abuse.”

Researchers added that their findings must be replicated in upcoming trials before widespread adoption of the strategy studied to treat opioid addiction. – by Janel Miller

Disclosures: Carroll reports she is a member of the company that made the computerized CBT used in this study. The other researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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