In the Journals

Hypertension, antihypertensive medication linked to primary hyperparathyroidism risk

A significantly higher risk for development of primary hyperparathyroidism in mostly older white women was associated with a history of hypertension and use of furosemide, according to recent findings.

“In this context, we hypothesized that hypertension, and the use of antihypertensive medication therapies, may predict risk of developing incident [primary hyperparathyroidism],” the researchers wrote. “We tested this hypothesis by conducting a large prospective study to examine the association between the diagnosis of hypertension and use of individual antihypertensives and risk of incident [primary hyperparathyroidism] in women participating in the [Nurses’ Health Study].”

Anand Vaidya, MD, MMSc, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues evaluated data from 75,600 women nurses from the Nurses’ Health Study, followed from 1986 to 2008, without primary hyperparathyroidism at baseline to determine whether history of hypertension and use of specific antihypertensive medications increased the risk for developing the condition. Participants also completed a lifetime assessment of primary hyperparathyroidism.

Among participants with hypertension, there were 222 incident cases of primary hyperparathyroidism during more than 700,000 person-years of follow-up compared with 125 cases during more than 1 million person-years of follow-up among those without hypertension, yielding an age-adjusted RR of 1.8 (95% CI, 1.43-2.26).

Among participants with hypertension, furosemide was the only antihypertensive medication class significantly associated with the risk for primary hyperthyroidism, yielding an age adjusted RR of 1.79 (95% CI, 1.15-2.79). After multivariable adjustment, which included other medication classes, the RR was 1.71 (95% CI, 1.08-2.71).

“In conclusion, in a large prospective cohort study of older predominantly Caucasian women, we observed that a history of hypertension and the use of furosemide were independently associated with a higher risk of developing [primary hyperparathyroidism],” the researchers wrote. “Beyond identifying these potential risk factors of [primary hyperparathyroidism], our findings … suggest that treatment of hypertension, or modulation of urinary calcium or sodium handling, may significantly influence the risk for developing [primary hyperparathyroidism]. The reproduction and validation of our findings in other large prospective cohorts or in intervention studies are needed to determine whether hypertension and furosemide represent modifiable risk factors of incident [primary hyperparathyroidism].” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A significantly higher risk for development of primary hyperparathyroidism in mostly older white women was associated with a history of hypertension and use of furosemide, according to recent findings.

“In this context, we hypothesized that hypertension, and the use of antihypertensive medication therapies, may predict risk of developing incident [primary hyperparathyroidism],” the researchers wrote. “We tested this hypothesis by conducting a large prospective study to examine the association between the diagnosis of hypertension and use of individual antihypertensives and risk of incident [primary hyperparathyroidism] in women participating in the [Nurses’ Health Study].”

Anand Vaidya, MD, MMSc, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues evaluated data from 75,600 women nurses from the Nurses’ Health Study, followed from 1986 to 2008, without primary hyperparathyroidism at baseline to determine whether history of hypertension and use of specific antihypertensive medications increased the risk for developing the condition. Participants also completed a lifetime assessment of primary hyperparathyroidism.

Among participants with hypertension, there were 222 incident cases of primary hyperparathyroidism during more than 700,000 person-years of follow-up compared with 125 cases during more than 1 million person-years of follow-up among those without hypertension, yielding an age-adjusted RR of 1.8 (95% CI, 1.43-2.26).

Among participants with hypertension, furosemide was the only antihypertensive medication class significantly associated with the risk for primary hyperthyroidism, yielding an age adjusted RR of 1.79 (95% CI, 1.15-2.79). After multivariable adjustment, which included other medication classes, the RR was 1.71 (95% CI, 1.08-2.71).

“In conclusion, in a large prospective cohort study of older predominantly Caucasian women, we observed that a history of hypertension and the use of furosemide were independently associated with a higher risk of developing [primary hyperparathyroidism],” the researchers wrote. “Beyond identifying these potential risk factors of [primary hyperparathyroidism], our findings … suggest that treatment of hypertension, or modulation of urinary calcium or sodium handling, may significantly influence the risk for developing [primary hyperparathyroidism]. The reproduction and validation of our findings in other large prospective cohorts or in intervention studies are needed to determine whether hypertension and furosemide represent modifiable risk factors of incident [primary hyperparathyroidism].” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.