In the Journals

Guidelines address thyroid disease in pregnancy

Revised guidelines from the American Thyroid Association for the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women were recently published in Thyroid.

“These guidelines represent the best effort to create a useful, practical and accurate document designed to help the practicing clinician, patients, researchers and health policy makers while also stimulating future research and discovery into this important and complex arena,” Elizabeth N. Pearce, MD, MSc, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, said in a press release.

Recommendations included in the guidelines address the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy, optimal iodine nutrition, the impact of thyroid autoantibodies, important thyroid considerations in infertile women, the treatment of hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules/cancer in pregnancy. The guidelines also address fetal, neonatal and lactation considerations.

“With an estimated 300,000 pregnancies impacted by thyroid disease in the United States annually, these guidelines coalesce the best available evidence into clear clinical recommendations, and should improve the health of many mothers and newborns alike,” Erik K. Alexander, MD, chief of the Thyroid Unit in the division of endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said in the release.

“We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision making in the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women. While all care must be individualized, such recommendations provide, in our opinion, optimal care paradigms for patients with these disorders,” Pearce said.

Disclosure: Alexander reports having been a consultant for Veracyte. Pearce reports having been a consultant for the Scientific Consulting Company GmbH. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Revised guidelines from the American Thyroid Association for the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women were recently published in Thyroid.

“These guidelines represent the best effort to create a useful, practical and accurate document designed to help the practicing clinician, patients, researchers and health policy makers while also stimulating future research and discovery into this important and complex arena,” Elizabeth N. Pearce, MD, MSc, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, said in a press release.

Recommendations included in the guidelines address the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy, optimal iodine nutrition, the impact of thyroid autoantibodies, important thyroid considerations in infertile women, the treatment of hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules/cancer in pregnancy. The guidelines also address fetal, neonatal and lactation considerations.

“With an estimated 300,000 pregnancies impacted by thyroid disease in the United States annually, these guidelines coalesce the best available evidence into clear clinical recommendations, and should improve the health of many mothers and newborns alike,” Erik K. Alexander, MD, chief of the Thyroid Unit in the division of endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said in the release.

“We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision making in the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women. While all care must be individualized, such recommendations provide, in our opinion, optimal care paradigms for patients with these disorders,” Pearce said.

Disclosure: Alexander reports having been a consultant for Veracyte. Pearce reports having been a consultant for the Scientific Consulting Company GmbH. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.