Meeting News Coverage

Autoimmune thyroid disease occurrence linked to vitamin D insufficiency

CORONADO, Calif. — Low vitamin D levels may be associated with the occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease in patients in China, according to research at the American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting.

Guofang Chen, MD, resident at Jiangsu Province Hospital on Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, in China, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study of 66 patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) as well as 52 healthy controls to determine vitamin D status as well as affecting factors of the disease. All participants were measured for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D), calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), triiodothyronine (TS), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase autoantibody (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb).

Guofang Chen

Guofang Chen

AITD patients had significantly lower 25-(OH)D levels compared with controls (14.8 ± 6.1 ng/ml vs. 17.64 ± 5.6 ng/ml, P<.01). Vitamin D insufficiency (25-(OH)D levels <20 ng/ml) was more common in AITD patients (81.7%) vs. controls (71.1%). Similarly, AITD patients had significantly higher levels of PTH and calcium compared with controls.

Compared with controls, only AITD patients with TPOAb levels >1,300 IU/ml had significantly lower 25-(OH)D levels. There were no associations found between (25-(OH)D), TSH and T4 levels.

“We found that vitamin D insufficiency is very high in China, especially for AITD patients,” Chen told Endocrine Today. “Clinicians should pay special attention to these patients, and when possible give them vitamin D supplements to make up for the insufficiency.” — by Amber Cox

For more information:

Chen G. Poster #18. Presented at:  American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting; Oct. 29-Nov. 2, 2014; Coronado, Calif.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

CORONADO, Calif. — Low vitamin D levels may be associated with the occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease in patients in China, according to research at the American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting.

Guofang Chen, MD, resident at Jiangsu Province Hospital on Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, in China, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study of 66 patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) as well as 52 healthy controls to determine vitamin D status as well as affecting factors of the disease. All participants were measured for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D), calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), triiodothyronine (TS), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase autoantibody (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb).

Guofang Chen

Guofang Chen

AITD patients had significantly lower 25-(OH)D levels compared with controls (14.8 ± 6.1 ng/ml vs. 17.64 ± 5.6 ng/ml, P<.01). Vitamin D insufficiency (25-(OH)D levels <20 ng/ml) was more common in AITD patients (81.7%) vs. controls (71.1%). Similarly, AITD patients had significantly higher levels of PTH and calcium compared with controls.

Compared with controls, only AITD patients with TPOAb levels >1,300 IU/ml had significantly lower 25-(OH)D levels. There were no associations found between (25-(OH)D), TSH and T4 levels.

“We found that vitamin D insufficiency is very high in China, especially for AITD patients,” Chen told Endocrine Today. “Clinicians should pay special attention to these patients, and when possible give them vitamin D supplements to make up for the insufficiency.” — by Amber Cox

For more information:

Chen G. Poster #18. Presented at:  American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting; Oct. 29-Nov. 2, 2014; Coronado, Calif.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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