Meeting News Coverage

Flibanserin treatment effective for hypoactive sexual desire disorder

Treatment response was high and time to response was short with flibanserin in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, according to findings presented at the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health Annual Meeting.

James A. Simon, MD, CCD, NCMP, FACOG, clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at The George Washington University School of Medicine, and colleagues evaluated data from three 24-week, double blind, placebo-controlled studies on women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder to determine the rate of response and time to response to flibanserin (Addyi, Sprout Pharmaceuticals). Data on sexually satisfying events were obtained from women randomly assigned to flibanserin 100 mg (n = 985) or placebo (n = 1,037), data from the Female Sexual Function Index were collected from 1,004 and 1,037 women, respectively, and data from the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised were collected from 1,035 and 1,076 women, respectively.

The probability of response was greater in the flibanserin group compared with placebo groups for sexually satisfying events (82.2% vs. 70%), the Female Sexual Function Index (74.4% vs. 59.8%) and the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised (80.4% vs. 68%). Similarly, for all efficacy measures, flibanserin yielded a shorter time to response compared with placebo (P < .0001) for all.

“In this post hoc analysis of data from randomized, placebo-controlled studies, the rate of treatment response was 74.4% to 82.2% in premenopausal women with [hypoactive sexual desire disorder] treated with flibanserin,” the researchers wrote. “Median time to response was approximately 2 months, suggesting that several weeks of treatment with flibanserin may be required before [hypoactive sexual desire disorder] symptom improvement is observed.” – by Amber Cox

Reference:

Simon JA, et al. Abstract 012. Presented at: International Society for the Study of Women’s Health Annual Meeting; Feb. 23-26, 2017; Atlanta.

Disclosure: The study was funded by Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC.

 

 

Treatment response was high and time to response was short with flibanserin in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, according to findings presented at the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health Annual Meeting.

James A. Simon, MD, CCD, NCMP, FACOG, clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at The George Washington University School of Medicine, and colleagues evaluated data from three 24-week, double blind, placebo-controlled studies on women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder to determine the rate of response and time to response to flibanserin (Addyi, Sprout Pharmaceuticals). Data on sexually satisfying events were obtained from women randomly assigned to flibanserin 100 mg (n = 985) or placebo (n = 1,037), data from the Female Sexual Function Index were collected from 1,004 and 1,037 women, respectively, and data from the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised were collected from 1,035 and 1,076 women, respectively.

The probability of response was greater in the flibanserin group compared with placebo groups for sexually satisfying events (82.2% vs. 70%), the Female Sexual Function Index (74.4% vs. 59.8%) and the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised (80.4% vs. 68%). Similarly, for all efficacy measures, flibanserin yielded a shorter time to response compared with placebo (P < .0001) for all.

“In this post hoc analysis of data from randomized, placebo-controlled studies, the rate of treatment response was 74.4% to 82.2% in premenopausal women with [hypoactive sexual desire disorder] treated with flibanserin,” the researchers wrote. “Median time to response was approximately 2 months, suggesting that several weeks of treatment with flibanserin may be required before [hypoactive sexual desire disorder] symptom improvement is observed.” – by Amber Cox

Reference:

Simon JA, et al. Abstract 012. Presented at: International Society for the Study of Women’s Health Annual Meeting; Feb. 23-26, 2017; Atlanta.

Disclosure: The study was funded by Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC.