In the Journals

Weight loss in PCOS normalizes anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations

Adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome and obesity who lost weight saw reductions in anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations, according to researchers in Germany.

Thomas Reinehr, MD, head of the department of pediatric endocrinology, diabetes and nutrition medicine, Vestische Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Witten/Herdecke, and colleagues evaluated 40 adolescent girls aged 13 to 16 years with obesity (50% with PCOS) to determine the relationship between anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration, weight status and androgens.

Participants took part in a 1-year outpatient intervention program based on physical activity, nutrition education and behavior therapy.

Compared with baseline, AMH concentrations were lower after the intervention in participants with PCOS who lost weight, whereas AMH concentrations did not change in participants with PCOS who gained weight.

Regardless of weight status, AMH concentrations did not change significantly in participants without PCOS.

Baseline AMH was associated with free androgen index (P = .007), testosterone (P = .001) and luteinizing hormone (P = .039), but not with androstenedione, sex hormone-binding globulin or estradiol in multiple regression analyses adjusted to baseline age, BMI and homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA).

Changes in AMH were associated with changes in testosterone (P = .026), luteinizing hormone (P = .039) and free androgen index (P = .032), but not with changes in SHBG, estradiol or androstenedione in multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for baseline age and BMI and changes in HOMA and BMI.
AMH concentrations were higher in adolescents with PCOS compared to girls without PCOS and normalized with weight loss,” the researchers wrote. “AMH concentrations were positively correlated with androgens and [luteinizing hormone] concentrations in univariate and multivariate analyses as well as in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses in our study. Future longitudinal research is necessary to determine the optimal cutoff for AMH concentrations suggestive for PCOS in obese and lean adolescents.” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: Reinehr reports receiving a research grant from Ferring. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome and obesity who lost weight saw reductions in anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations, according to researchers in Germany.

Thomas Reinehr, MD, head of the department of pediatric endocrinology, diabetes and nutrition medicine, Vestische Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Witten/Herdecke, and colleagues evaluated 40 adolescent girls aged 13 to 16 years with obesity (50% with PCOS) to determine the relationship between anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration, weight status and androgens.

Participants took part in a 1-year outpatient intervention program based on physical activity, nutrition education and behavior therapy.

Compared with baseline, AMH concentrations were lower after the intervention in participants with PCOS who lost weight, whereas AMH concentrations did not change in participants with PCOS who gained weight.

Regardless of weight status, AMH concentrations did not change significantly in participants without PCOS.

Baseline AMH was associated with free androgen index (P = .007), testosterone (P = .001) and luteinizing hormone (P = .039), but not with androstenedione, sex hormone-binding globulin or estradiol in multiple regression analyses adjusted to baseline age, BMI and homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA).

Changes in AMH were associated with changes in testosterone (P = .026), luteinizing hormone (P = .039) and free androgen index (P = .032), but not with changes in SHBG, estradiol or androstenedione in multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for baseline age and BMI and changes in HOMA and BMI.
AMH concentrations were higher in adolescents with PCOS compared to girls without PCOS and normalized with weight loss,” the researchers wrote. “AMH concentrations were positively correlated with androgens and [luteinizing hormone] concentrations in univariate and multivariate analyses as well as in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses in our study. Future longitudinal research is necessary to determine the optimal cutoff for AMH concentrations suggestive for PCOS in obese and lean adolescents.” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: Reinehr reports receiving a research grant from Ferring. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.