Meeting News Coverage

Diabetes linked to low milk supply in breast-feeding mothers

New mothers presenting with low milk supply were 2.6 times more likely to have experienced diabetes during pregnancy, according to research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research joint meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia.

“This study was meant to be an early step in trying to define whether insulin resistance might be a problem in building normal milk supply,” Sarah W. Riddle, MD, of the division of general and community pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, told Endocrine Today.

Sarah W. Riddle, MD

Sarah W. Riddle

This study looked at 561 women whose infants were younger than 90 days and who presented to a breast-feeding medicine clinic with breast-feeding complications: The controls consisted of women with nipple symptoms (n=226) and the study cases had low milk supply and no other obvious complications (n=175).

In the control group, 6.2% had gestational diabetes; in the low milk supply group, 14.9% had gestational diabetes (adjusted OR=2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.2).

Riddle and colleagues concluded that decreasing pancreatic insulin in conjunction with insulin resistance may contribute to gestational diabetes and low milk supply.

“Clinically, we don’t have a lot to offer mothers with low milk supply in terms of therapy,” Riddle said. “If this hypothesis continues to be supported, it may lend itself to an expanded range of therapy options for mothers who are struggling to build a milk supply.”

She said there are plans to start a randomized controlled trial of metformin in idiopathic low milk supply and insulin resistance. — by Katrina Altersitz

For more information:

Riddle SW. #3802.75. Presented at: the Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Pediatric Research joint meeting; May 3-5, 2014; Vancouver, British Columbia.

Disclosure: Riddle reports no relevant financial disclosures.

New mothers presenting with low milk supply were 2.6 times more likely to have experienced diabetes during pregnancy, according to research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research joint meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia.

“This study was meant to be an early step in trying to define whether insulin resistance might be a problem in building normal milk supply,” Sarah W. Riddle, MD, of the division of general and community pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, told Endocrine Today.

Sarah W. Riddle, MD

Sarah W. Riddle

This study looked at 561 women whose infants were younger than 90 days and who presented to a breast-feeding medicine clinic with breast-feeding complications: The controls consisted of women with nipple symptoms (n=226) and the study cases had low milk supply and no other obvious complications (n=175).

In the control group, 6.2% had gestational diabetes; in the low milk supply group, 14.9% had gestational diabetes (adjusted OR=2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.2).

Riddle and colleagues concluded that decreasing pancreatic insulin in conjunction with insulin resistance may contribute to gestational diabetes and low milk supply.

“Clinically, we don’t have a lot to offer mothers with low milk supply in terms of therapy,” Riddle said. “If this hypothesis continues to be supported, it may lend itself to an expanded range of therapy options for mothers who are struggling to build a milk supply.”

She said there are plans to start a randomized controlled trial of metformin in idiopathic low milk supply and insulin resistance. — by Katrina Altersitz

For more information:

Riddle SW. #3802.75. Presented at: the Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Pediatric Research joint meeting; May 3-5, 2014; Vancouver, British Columbia.

Disclosure: Riddle reports no relevant financial disclosures.