Meeting News Coverage

Adult endometrial cancer risk possibly linked to childhood BMI, height

The risk for endometrial cancer in adults may be associated with BMI and height during childhood, according to study results presented at the European Congress on Obesity annual meeting.

At age 7 years, the risk for endometrial cancer in adulthood increased 18% for each increase in BMI z score and by 12% for each increase in height z score, according to a press release.

Researchers from the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark identified 158,459 women (born 1930 to 1989) from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register and analyzed data from their measured height and weight during childhood (ages 7 to 13 years) to determine whether either factor affected endometrial cancer risk in adulthood.

The patients were followed until a diagnosis, hysterectomy, death or emigration occurred; they were lost to follow-up; or until the cutoff date of Dec. 31, 2010, the researchers said.

According to data, 940 patients were diagnosed with endometrial cancer during follow-up.

The researchers plan to follow the cohort members from later birth years as they continue to age to assess their risk for developing endometrial cancer, according to the release.

For more information:

Aarestrup J. Abstract#T3T4:OS1.4. Presented at: the European Congress on Obesity; May 12-15, 2013; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The risk for endometrial cancer in adults may be associated with BMI and height during childhood, according to study results presented at the European Congress on Obesity annual meeting.

At age 7 years, the risk for endometrial cancer in adulthood increased 18% for each increase in BMI z score and by 12% for each increase in height z score, according to a press release.

Researchers from the Institute of Preventive Medicine at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark identified 158,459 women (born 1930 to 1989) from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register and analyzed data from their measured height and weight during childhood (ages 7 to 13 years) to determine whether either factor affected endometrial cancer risk in adulthood.

The patients were followed until a diagnosis, hysterectomy, death or emigration occurred; they were lost to follow-up; or until the cutoff date of Dec. 31, 2010, the researchers said.

According to data, 940 patients were diagnosed with endometrial cancer during follow-up.

The researchers plan to follow the cohort members from later birth years as they continue to age to assess their risk for developing endometrial cancer, according to the release.

For more information:

Aarestrup J. Abstract#T3T4:OS1.4. Presented at: the European Congress on Obesity; May 12-15, 2013; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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