Meeting News Coverage

Experts forecast increased obesity-related dementia in England

Researchers from the UK Health Forum of London predict that approximately 7% of England’s population aged older than 65 years will have obesity-related dementia by 2050. Preliminary data were presented at the European Congress on Obesity annual meeting.

According to abstract data, the Alzheimer’s Research Trust expects the increased prevalence to cost 41 billion pounds ($62.5 billion) a year compared with 23 billion pounds ($35 billion) currently being spent on health, social, informal care and lost productivity associated with obesity.

Researchers said they used computer modeling to estimate the rise in obesity trends based on three scenarios: 1) the effects of dementia if the current trends continue; 2) the effects of a 5% reduction in obesity prevalence; 3) and the effects of obesity levels on the aging population.

The Health Survey for England 2011 recognizes that 24% of men and 26% of women are currently obese. According to data, the obesity trends are expected to double to 46% for men and 31% for women by 2050.

Furthermore, the researchers said if BMI rates were to remain as they are, a 10% reduction in new cases would be observed. However, an intervention to reduce BMI would decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes sooner than it would with dementia.

Therefore, these findings suggest that interventions are needed to prevent obesity and its related comorbidities, such as dementia.

For more information:

Webber L. Abstract#T3T4:OS1.3. Presented at: the European Congress on Obesity; May 12-15, 2013; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers from the UK Health Forum of London predict that approximately 7% of England’s population aged older than 65 years will have obesity-related dementia by 2050. Preliminary data were presented at the European Congress on Obesity annual meeting.

According to abstract data, the Alzheimer’s Research Trust expects the increased prevalence to cost 41 billion pounds ($62.5 billion) a year compared with 23 billion pounds ($35 billion) currently being spent on health, social, informal care and lost productivity associated with obesity.

Researchers said they used computer modeling to estimate the rise in obesity trends based on three scenarios: 1) the effects of dementia if the current trends continue; 2) the effects of a 5% reduction in obesity prevalence; 3) and the effects of obesity levels on the aging population.

The Health Survey for England 2011 recognizes that 24% of men and 26% of women are currently obese. According to data, the obesity trends are expected to double to 46% for men and 31% for women by 2050.

Furthermore, the researchers said if BMI rates were to remain as they are, a 10% reduction in new cases would be observed. However, an intervention to reduce BMI would decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes sooner than it would with dementia.

Therefore, these findings suggest that interventions are needed to prevent obesity and its related comorbidities, such as dementia.

For more information:

Webber L. Abstract#T3T4:OS1.3. Presented at: the European Congress on Obesity; May 12-15, 2013; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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