In the Journals

Better fitness provides benefits for heart function in obesity

Adults with obesity can benefit from improved left ventricular systolic myocardial function with better fitness, according to findings presented in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.

Hilde Halland, MD, of the department of clinical science at the University of Bergen in Norway, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study based on data from the FATCOR study, which was performed at Haukeland University Hospital in Norway from 2009 to 2017. Researchers recruited 620 adults aged 30 to 65 years with a BMI greater than 27 kg/m2 and no history of CVD. Data from 469 participants (mean age, 47 years; 60% women; mean BMI, 32 kg/m2) were analyzed by Halland and colleagues.

Speckle-tracking echocardiography assessed peak global longitudinal strain, which was used as a measure of left ventricular systolic myocardial function. Participants were assessed for their fitness levels based on peak oxygen uptake during a treadmill workout via ergospirometry.

The researchers found an association between participants with obesity who were considered fit based on peak oxygen uptake and elevated measures of global longitudinal strain (OR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.99), which equated to superior left ventricular systolic myocardial function. The researchers also found an association between better fitness and higher levels of ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and pulse pressure/stroke volume index (P < .05 for all). Conversely, there was an association between better fitness and lower body fat percentage (P < .05).

In contrast to the findings among participants with obesity, the researchers did note an association between improved fitness and lower body fat percentage and triglycerides in participants with overweight (P < .05 for all), but the association with left ventricular myocardial function was not present.

“The findings suggest that obesity-associated [left ventricular] myocardial dysfunction may be modified by fitness through reductions in body fat mass percentage,” the researchers wrote. “Overall, these results highlight the value of including [global longitudinal strain] in evaluation of subclinical [left ventricular] systolic dysfunction in obesity.” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Adults with obesity can benefit from improved left ventricular systolic myocardial function with better fitness, according to findings presented in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.

Hilde Halland, MD, of the department of clinical science at the University of Bergen in Norway, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study based on data from the FATCOR study, which was performed at Haukeland University Hospital in Norway from 2009 to 2017. Researchers recruited 620 adults aged 30 to 65 years with a BMI greater than 27 kg/m2 and no history of CVD. Data from 469 participants (mean age, 47 years; 60% women; mean BMI, 32 kg/m2) were analyzed by Halland and colleagues.

Speckle-tracking echocardiography assessed peak global longitudinal strain, which was used as a measure of left ventricular systolic myocardial function. Participants were assessed for their fitness levels based on peak oxygen uptake during a treadmill workout via ergospirometry.

The researchers found an association between participants with obesity who were considered fit based on peak oxygen uptake and elevated measures of global longitudinal strain (OR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.99), which equated to superior left ventricular systolic myocardial function. The researchers also found an association between better fitness and higher levels of ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and pulse pressure/stroke volume index (P < .05 for all). Conversely, there was an association between better fitness and lower body fat percentage (P < .05).

In contrast to the findings among participants with obesity, the researchers did note an association between improved fitness and lower body fat percentage and triglycerides in participants with overweight (P < .05 for all), but the association with left ventricular myocardial function was not present.

“The findings suggest that obesity-associated [left ventricular] myocardial dysfunction may be modified by fitness through reductions in body fat mass percentage,” the researchers wrote. “Overall, these results highlight the value of including [global longitudinal strain] in evaluation of subclinical [left ventricular] systolic dysfunction in obesity.” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.