Recent updates on obesity research

On this World Obesity Day, here’s a look at the most popular recent topics in obesity research at Endocrine Today, including how vitamin D can help with childhood obesity, what weight gain does to breathing while asleep and how adjusting when you eat can impact weight loss.

Vitamin D supplementation may improve metabolic syndrome parameters in children with obesity

Children with overweight and obesity assigned to receive vitamin D supplementation for 1 year experienced decreases in BMI and fat mass and a rise in HDL cholesterol vs. similar children assigned to placebo, according to study findings presented at the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology annual meeting.

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Obesity, weight change may predict trajectory of childhood sleep-disordered breathing

Children with obesity and sleep-disordered breathing are more likely to have persistent sleep conditions into adolescence vs. children without obesity, whereas children who lose weight are more likely to experience remission of sleep-disordered breathing symptoms, according to study findings published in Pediatric Obesity.

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Changes in meal timings may reduce body fat

Practicing time-restricted feeding that pushes breakfast later and dinner earlier, a type of intermittent fasting, may help people lose body fat, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science.

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Metformin ineffective for long-term metabolic improvements in teen obesity

Adolescents with obesity assigned to long-term metformin therapy experienced initial improvements in BMI and insulin resistance that were not sustained after 3 years, according to findings published in Nutrition & Diabetes.

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Discrimination may contribute to obesity among US Latinos

Experience of routine discrimination by adult Latinos may lead to increased BMI and contribute to growing obesity rates, according to study results published in Obesity.

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Terminology matters in medical communication about obesity

People with obesity view language such as “obese person” as stigmatizing and prefer that health care providers use people-first language, such as “person with obesity,” when discussing weight, according to survey findings published in a research letter in JAMA Surgery.

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On this World Obesity Day, here’s a look at the most popular recent topics in obesity research at Endocrine Today, including how vitamin D can help with childhood obesity, what weight gain does to breathing while asleep and how adjusting when you eat can impact weight loss.

Vitamin D supplementation may improve metabolic syndrome parameters in children with obesity

Children with overweight and obesity assigned to receive vitamin D supplementation for 1 year experienced decreases in BMI and fat mass and a rise in HDL cholesterol vs. similar children assigned to placebo, according to study findings presented at the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology annual meeting.

READ

Obesity, weight change may predict trajectory of childhood sleep-disordered breathing

Children with obesity and sleep-disordered breathing are more likely to have persistent sleep conditions into adolescence vs. children without obesity, whereas children who lose weight are more likely to experience remission of sleep-disordered breathing symptoms, according to study findings published in Pediatric Obesity.

READ

Changes in meal timings may reduce body fat

Practicing time-restricted feeding that pushes breakfast later and dinner earlier, a type of intermittent fasting, may help people lose body fat, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science.

READ

Metformin ineffective for long-term metabolic improvements in teen obesity

Adolescents with obesity assigned to long-term metformin therapy experienced initial improvements in BMI and insulin resistance that were not sustained after 3 years, according to findings published in Nutrition & Diabetes.

READ

Discrimination may contribute to obesity among US Latinos

Experience of routine discrimination by adult Latinos may lead to increased BMI and contribute to growing obesity rates, according to study results published in Obesity.

READ

Terminology matters in medical communication about obesity

People with obesity view language such as “obese person” as stigmatizing and prefer that health care providers use people-first language, such as “person with obesity,” when discussing weight, according to survey findings published in a research letter in JAMA Surgery.

READ