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Adiponectin measured with newborn dried blood spots may increase infant growth

Infant growth from birth to 18 months may be associated with adiponectin measured using newborn dried blood spots, according to study findings presented at Obesity Week.

“Adipokines play important roles in regulating satiety and metabolism, but how newborn measures are associated with later growth remains unclear,” the researchers wrote.

Edwina Yeung, PhD, an investigator in the epidemiology branch of the division of intramural population health research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues evaluated 2,169 children to determine whether infant growth from 0 to 18 months is associated with adipokine levels in dried blood spots taken at birth. Further, researchers aimed to determine whether there are associations between rapid weight gain and risk for high BMI defined as weight >90th percentile among infants aged 18 and 36 months. A child health journal was used by mothers to record anthropometric measures from pediatric visits from birth to 3 years.

Researchers found a significant association between increased weight-for-age z scores from age 0 to 18 months and adiponectin and resistin. Similarly, a significant association was found between increased BMI z scores and adiponectin and resistin. Increased weight-for-length was associated with adiponectin (P=.004), and a borderline association with resistin was noted (P=.1). Adiponectin was no longer associated with growth measures while resistin still was associated with weight-for-age after adjustment for birth weight.

Risk for high BMI at 18 months or 3 years was not associated with adiponectin or resistin (P>.03).

“Adiponectin measured using newborn dried blood spots may be associated with increased infant growth from birth to 18 months largely due to its association with birth weight, while higher resistin levels may be an indicator of increased infant weight-for-age irrespective of birth weight,” the researchers wrote.

For more information:

Yeung E. Abstract TLB-02-OR. Presented at: Obesity Week; Nov. 2-7, 2014; Boston.

Disclosure: The study was funded in part by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Infant growth from birth to 18 months may be associated with adiponectin measured using newborn dried blood spots, according to study findings presented at Obesity Week.

“Adipokines play important roles in regulating satiety and metabolism, but how newborn measures are associated with later growth remains unclear,” the researchers wrote.

Edwina Yeung, PhD, an investigator in the epidemiology branch of the division of intramural population health research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues evaluated 2,169 children to determine whether infant growth from 0 to 18 months is associated with adipokine levels in dried blood spots taken at birth. Further, researchers aimed to determine whether there are associations between rapid weight gain and risk for high BMI defined as weight >90th percentile among infants aged 18 and 36 months. A child health journal was used by mothers to record anthropometric measures from pediatric visits from birth to 3 years.

Researchers found a significant association between increased weight-for-age z scores from age 0 to 18 months and adiponectin and resistin. Similarly, a significant association was found between increased BMI z scores and adiponectin and resistin. Increased weight-for-length was associated with adiponectin (P=.004), and a borderline association with resistin was noted (P=.1). Adiponectin was no longer associated with growth measures while resistin still was associated with weight-for-age after adjustment for birth weight.

Risk for high BMI at 18 months or 3 years was not associated with adiponectin or resistin (P>.03).

“Adiponectin measured using newborn dried blood spots may be associated with increased infant growth from birth to 18 months largely due to its association with birth weight, while higher resistin levels may be an indicator of increased infant weight-for-age irrespective of birth weight,” the researchers wrote.

For more information:

Yeung E. Abstract TLB-02-OR. Presented at: Obesity Week; Nov. 2-7, 2014; Boston.

Disclosure: The study was funded in part by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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