Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: NAMS recommends individualized hormone therapy in menopause

PHILADELPHIA — In this video exclusive, JoAnn V. Pinkerton, MD, NCMP, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Virginia and executive director of The North American Menopause Society reviews the NAMS 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement. For women aged younger than 60 years or within 10 years of menopause, hormone therapy is safe and effective for relieving hot flushes and night sweats, improving sleep and preventing osteoporosis and fractures, according to the statement.

HT is recommended for women with early menopause, who often face increased risks for CVD, bone loss, dementia and Parkinson’s, for example, at least until the age of normal menopause, Pinkerton said.

The statement also addresses characteristics of women who should not begin hormone therapy: Those older than 60 years or more than 10 years from menopause have greater risks for cardiovascular conditions and dementia that may not outweigh the benefits of HT.

There is no age at which HT must be discontinued, Pinkerton said. Instead, therapy should be personalized through regular discussion of an individual woman’s symptoms and risks. Newer combinations of hormones and novel delivery methods expand the range of choices for women with considerations such as metabolic conditions, fatty liver or vaginal symptoms alone.

“We really want to change the conversation, we want to take away the fear of hormone therapy, and say for women who are close to menopause ... that hormone therapy is actually safe and effective,” Pinkerton said. She underlined that FDA-approved products are recommended; NAMS recommends against compounded hormones for HT.

PHILADELPHIA — In this video exclusive, JoAnn V. Pinkerton, MD, NCMP, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Virginia and executive director of The North American Menopause Society reviews the NAMS 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement. For women aged younger than 60 years or within 10 years of menopause, hormone therapy is safe and effective for relieving hot flushes and night sweats, improving sleep and preventing osteoporosis and fractures, according to the statement.

HT is recommended for women with early menopause, who often face increased risks for CVD, bone loss, dementia and Parkinson’s, for example, at least until the age of normal menopause, Pinkerton said.

The statement also addresses characteristics of women who should not begin hormone therapy: Those older than 60 years or more than 10 years from menopause have greater risks for cardiovascular conditions and dementia that may not outweigh the benefits of HT.

There is no age at which HT must be discontinued, Pinkerton said. Instead, therapy should be personalized through regular discussion of an individual woman’s symptoms and risks. Newer combinations of hormones and novel delivery methods expand the range of choices for women with considerations such as metabolic conditions, fatty liver or vaginal symptoms alone.

“We really want to change the conversation, we want to take away the fear of hormone therapy, and say for women who are close to menopause ... that hormone therapy is actually safe and effective,” Pinkerton said. She underlined that FDA-approved products are recommended; NAMS recommends against compounded hormones for HT.

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