Meeting News Coverage

V-Go insulin device demonstrates efficacy in patients with LADA, type 1 diabetes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device was effective for treatment of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes or type 1 diabetes, according to recent study findings.

In a subanalysis of a larger study, Rosemarie Lajara, MD, and Donna Doherty, MS, RD, LD, CPT, CDE, both of Diabetes America in Plano, Texas, evaluated 21 adults aged 21 years or older with HbA1c levels greater than 7% and latent autoimmune diabetes or type 1 diabetes to determine the safety and efficacy of switching from multiple daily injections to V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device (V-Go). Patients involved in the study had a history of poorly controlled LADA or type 1 diabetes. HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, weight, insulin dosing and reported hypoglycemic levels were evaluated for changes from baseline. Mean exposure to V-Go was 103 days at the time of analysis.

In the patients using V-Go therapy, there was a 1.2% decrease in HbA1c from baseline (P = .0004) as well as a 12 U per day decrease in total daily insulin dose (P = .0494).There was an 81 mg/dL decrease in fasting plasma glucose whereas a 21% decrease was found for daily basal insulin dose.

Problematic hypoglycemia was reported less often among patients on V-Go therapy compared with past multiple daily injection therapy.

“Many patients with diabetes are unsuccessful at reaching and maintaining therapeutic goals,” the researchers wrote. “Multiple daily injections can be a burden for those with [latent autoimmune diabetes] or [type 1 diabetes] and data is limited in this patient type using V-Go therapy,” the researchers wrote. 

However, with significant HbA1c decreases and no increase in reported hypoglycemia, larger controlled studies are needed to fully evaluate the use of V-Go in this patient population, according to the researchers. – by Amber Cox

Reference:

Lajara R, Doherty D. Abstract #272T. Presented at: AACE 24th Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress; May 13-17, 2015; Nashville, Tenn.

Disclosure: Lajara reports financial ties with Novo Nordisk and Valeritas. Doherty reports no relevant financial disclosures. 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device was effective for treatment of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes or type 1 diabetes, according to recent study findings.

In a subanalysis of a larger study, Rosemarie Lajara, MD, and Donna Doherty, MS, RD, LD, CPT, CDE, both of Diabetes America in Plano, Texas, evaluated 21 adults aged 21 years or older with HbA1c levels greater than 7% and latent autoimmune diabetes or type 1 diabetes to determine the safety and efficacy of switching from multiple daily injections to V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device (V-Go). Patients involved in the study had a history of poorly controlled LADA or type 1 diabetes. HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, weight, insulin dosing and reported hypoglycemic levels were evaluated for changes from baseline. Mean exposure to V-Go was 103 days at the time of analysis.

In the patients using V-Go therapy, there was a 1.2% decrease in HbA1c from baseline (P = .0004) as well as a 12 U per day decrease in total daily insulin dose (P = .0494).There was an 81 mg/dL decrease in fasting plasma glucose whereas a 21% decrease was found for daily basal insulin dose.

Problematic hypoglycemia was reported less often among patients on V-Go therapy compared with past multiple daily injection therapy.

“Many patients with diabetes are unsuccessful at reaching and maintaining therapeutic goals,” the researchers wrote. “Multiple daily injections can be a burden for those with [latent autoimmune diabetes] or [type 1 diabetes] and data is limited in this patient type using V-Go therapy,” the researchers wrote. 

However, with significant HbA1c decreases and no increase in reported hypoglycemia, larger controlled studies are needed to fully evaluate the use of V-Go in this patient population, according to the researchers. – by Amber Cox

Reference:

Lajara R, Doherty D. Abstract #272T. Presented at: AACE 24th Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress; May 13-17, 2015; Nashville, Tenn.

Disclosure: Lajara reports financial ties with Novo Nordisk and Valeritas. Doherty reports no relevant financial disclosures. 

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