In the Journals

Greater immature platelet fraction reduces CAD risk, but ‘no difference’ for blood glucose

The risk for coronary artery disease may be lower among those with diabetes who have elevated vs. lower immature platelet fraction, although glucose management is unaffected by this biomarker, according to findings published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.

“The present study shows that the immature platelet fraction (IPF) is not associated to diabetes or glucose control parameters. In fact, neither diabetes nor glucose control parameters emerged as independent predictors of IPF above the median,” Giuseppe De Luca, MD, PhD, an associate professor in the department of cardiology at Ospedale “Maggiore della Carità,” Eastern Piedmont University in Novara, Italy, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, until new data become available, elevated IPF should not be systematically applied on a large scale as cardiovascular risk marker in patients with diabetes.”

De Luca and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study using data from 1,121 adults without diabetes (mean age, 67.6 years; 28% women) and 660 adults with diabetes (mean age, 69.6 years; 29.8% women) who were recruited from Ospedale “Maggiore della Carità.” The researchers used data from coronary angiographies to determine the presence of CAD, and they determined the IPF from baseline blood samples. If a participant had a greater than 50% coronary stenosis, they were considered to have CAD.

Diabetes glucose test 2019 
The risk for coronary artery disease may be lower among those with diabetes who have elevated vs. lower immature platelet fraction, although glucose management is unaffected by this biomarker.
Source: Adobe Stock

Participants with diabetes had similar levels of IPF compared with those who did not have diabetes, with the researchers setting a median of 2.9% for the entire cohort. There was also no correlation between glycemia or HbA1c and IPF, according to the researchers. However, 80.5% of those with diabetes and an IPF of more than 2.9% had CAD, whereas 86.5% of those with diabetes and an IPF of less than 2.9% had the condition (P = .04). Participants with diabetes and an IPF of more than 2.9% were 36% less likely to have CAD compared with those with diabetes and lower IPF levels (OR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.97).

“We found no difference in the mean levels of IPF or the rate of IPF above the median in patients with or without diabetes, with additional no relationship between this platelet index and glycemic control,” the researchers wrote. “Moreover, reticulated platelets did not affect the angiographic findings in the population affected by diabetes, and IPF above the median were associated with an even lower prevalence of CAD in these patients.” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

The risk for coronary artery disease may be lower among those with diabetes who have elevated vs. lower immature platelet fraction, although glucose management is unaffected by this biomarker, according to findings published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.

“The present study shows that the immature platelet fraction (IPF) is not associated to diabetes or glucose control parameters. In fact, neither diabetes nor glucose control parameters emerged as independent predictors of IPF above the median,” Giuseppe De Luca, MD, PhD, an associate professor in the department of cardiology at Ospedale “Maggiore della Carità,” Eastern Piedmont University in Novara, Italy, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, until new data become available, elevated IPF should not be systematically applied on a large scale as cardiovascular risk marker in patients with diabetes.”

De Luca and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study using data from 1,121 adults without diabetes (mean age, 67.6 years; 28% women) and 660 adults with diabetes (mean age, 69.6 years; 29.8% women) who were recruited from Ospedale “Maggiore della Carità.” The researchers used data from coronary angiographies to determine the presence of CAD, and they determined the IPF from baseline blood samples. If a participant had a greater than 50% coronary stenosis, they were considered to have CAD.

Diabetes glucose test 2019 
The risk for coronary artery disease may be lower among those with diabetes who have elevated vs. lower immature platelet fraction, although glucose management is unaffected by this biomarker.
Source: Adobe Stock

Participants with diabetes had similar levels of IPF compared with those who did not have diabetes, with the researchers setting a median of 2.9% for the entire cohort. There was also no correlation between glycemia or HbA1c and IPF, according to the researchers. However, 80.5% of those with diabetes and an IPF of more than 2.9% had CAD, whereas 86.5% of those with diabetes and an IPF of less than 2.9% had the condition (P = .04). Participants with diabetes and an IPF of more than 2.9% were 36% less likely to have CAD compared with those with diabetes and lower IPF levels (OR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.97).

“We found no difference in the mean levels of IPF or the rate of IPF above the median in patients with or without diabetes, with additional no relationship between this platelet index and glycemic control,” the researchers wrote. “Moreover, reticulated platelets did not affect the angiographic findings in the population affected by diabetes, and IPF above the median were associated with an even lower prevalence of CAD in these patients.” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.