In the Journals

Type 2 diabetes reduces survival time in postoperative kidney cancer

Having type 2 diabetes before kidney removal surgery due to renal cell carcinoma can negatively affect survival and cancer recurrence outcomes, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes.

“Type 2 diabetes has negative effects on the prognosis of certain tumors, such as breast, liver, endometrial and colorectal tumors, in which a significant reduction in cancer-specific survival was observed in patients with [type 2 diabetes],” Weibing Shuang, MD, of the department of urology at the First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University in China, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, researchers have questioned whether [type 2 diabetes] may exert adverse effects on the prognosis of [renal cell carcinoma].”

Shuang and colleagues conducted a retrospective study assessing overall survival, cancer specific-survival and recurrence-free survival in 451 adults with renal cell carcinoma (mean age, 57.6 years; 34.1% women) following nephrectomy. According to the researchers, all participants were recruited from 2013 to 2018 at the First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University where they received the operation and were then followed for a median of 24 months. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed in 74 of the participants prior to surgery.

After 5 years, the overall survival rate was lower for those with type 2 diabetes compared with the rate of those without the condition (79.3% vs. 90.8%; P = .009), according to the researchers, who added that the cancer-specific survival rate for those with type 2 diabetes was reduced vs. those without the condition (89.1% vs. 94.9%; P = .043) in the same period. Recurrence-free survival was also less frequent for those with type 2 diabetes compared with the rate for participants without the condition (80.5% vs. 90%; P = .008). The researchers stated that type 2 diabetes independently predicted the likelihood of overall survival (HR = 3.391; 95% CI, 1.458-7.886), cancer-free survival (HR = 4.637; 95% CI, 1.42-15.139) and recurrence-free survival (HR = 3.492; 95% CI, 1.516-8.044).

“This finding confirms the importance of [type 2 diabetes] in determining the prognosis of patients with [renal cell carcinoma],” the researchers wrote. “Based on the results of the present study, we postulate that clinicians should monitor and actively treat [type 2 diabetes] to improve the survival of and reduce the recurrence rate in patients with [renal cell carcinoma].” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Having type 2 diabetes before kidney removal surgery due to renal cell carcinoma can negatively affect survival and cancer recurrence outcomes, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes.

“Type 2 diabetes has negative effects on the prognosis of certain tumors, such as breast, liver, endometrial and colorectal tumors, in which a significant reduction in cancer-specific survival was observed in patients with [type 2 diabetes],” Weibing Shuang, MD, of the department of urology at the First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University in China, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, researchers have questioned whether [type 2 diabetes] may exert adverse effects on the prognosis of [renal cell carcinoma].”

Shuang and colleagues conducted a retrospective study assessing overall survival, cancer specific-survival and recurrence-free survival in 451 adults with renal cell carcinoma (mean age, 57.6 years; 34.1% women) following nephrectomy. According to the researchers, all participants were recruited from 2013 to 2018 at the First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University where they received the operation and were then followed for a median of 24 months. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed in 74 of the participants prior to surgery.

After 5 years, the overall survival rate was lower for those with type 2 diabetes compared with the rate of those without the condition (79.3% vs. 90.8%; P = .009), according to the researchers, who added that the cancer-specific survival rate for those with type 2 diabetes was reduced vs. those without the condition (89.1% vs. 94.9%; P = .043) in the same period. Recurrence-free survival was also less frequent for those with type 2 diabetes compared with the rate for participants without the condition (80.5% vs. 90%; P = .008). The researchers stated that type 2 diabetes independently predicted the likelihood of overall survival (HR = 3.391; 95% CI, 1.458-7.886), cancer-free survival (HR = 4.637; 95% CI, 1.42-15.139) and recurrence-free survival (HR = 3.492; 95% CI, 1.516-8.044).

“This finding confirms the importance of [type 2 diabetes] in determining the prognosis of patients with [renal cell carcinoma],” the researchers wrote. “Based on the results of the present study, we postulate that clinicians should monitor and actively treat [type 2 diabetes] to improve the survival of and reduce the recurrence rate in patients with [renal cell carcinoma].” – by Phil Neuffer

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.