Meeting News Coverage

Men with type 1 diabetes controlled blood glucose better than women

Females with type 1 diabetes were more likely to have higher HbA1c than their male counterparts, data from 12 countries showed.

In a poster presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting, researchers found that females aged 15 to 29 years and women older than 30 years were 8% and 6% more likely, respectively, to miss their blood glucose target than males in the same age groups.

“In this analysis of type 1 diabetes data from several countries, males were more likely to have better blood sugar control profiles than females. Further work is required to investigate explanations for this finding,” Sarah Wild, MB BCHIR, PhD, of the International quality of care for type 1 diabetes group, said in a press release. “One explanation could be that women tend to have lower hemoglobin levels, but further research is required to confirm this.”

Researchers analyzed data from 142,260 children and adults with type 1 diabetes from Austria, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Latvia, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, Slovenia, Sweden, Ukraine and the United States. They evaluated patients’ glycemic control throughout the previous 1 to 2 years.

In the patients older than 15 years, women had higher adjusted ORs for HbA1c ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol). For patients aged 15 to 29 years, the adjusted OR was 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02-1.13); in the group aged at least 30 years, the adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.10).

For more information:

Wild S. #273. Presented at: 49th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes; Sept. 24-27; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Females with type 1 diabetes were more likely to have higher HbA1c than their male counterparts, data from 12 countries showed.

In a poster presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting, researchers found that females aged 15 to 29 years and women older than 30 years were 8% and 6% more likely, respectively, to miss their blood glucose target than males in the same age groups.

“In this analysis of type 1 diabetes data from several countries, males were more likely to have better blood sugar control profiles than females. Further work is required to investigate explanations for this finding,” Sarah Wild, MB BCHIR, PhD, of the International quality of care for type 1 diabetes group, said in a press release. “One explanation could be that women tend to have lower hemoglobin levels, but further research is required to confirm this.”

Researchers analyzed data from 142,260 children and adults with type 1 diabetes from Austria, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Latvia, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, Slovenia, Sweden, Ukraine and the United States. They evaluated patients’ glycemic control throughout the previous 1 to 2 years.

In the patients older than 15 years, women had higher adjusted ORs for HbA1c ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol). For patients aged 15 to 29 years, the adjusted OR was 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02-1.13); in the group aged at least 30 years, the adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.10).

For more information:

Wild S. #273. Presented at: 49th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes; Sept. 24-27; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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