US launch of Medtronic MiniMed hybrid closed-loop system to begin

Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G system, the world’s first hybrid closed-loop system for people with type 1 diabetes, has been launched in the United States, according to a company press release.

The new system features Medtronic’s SmartGuard HCL technology and Guardian Sensor 3, the only FDA-approved insulin pump that enables personalized and automated delivery of basal insulin, according to the release. Blood glucose is also monitored using Ascensia Diabetes Care’s Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose monitoring system.

“This technology is a significant breakthrough for the diabetes community, and as a practicing endocrinologist, I have been awaiting this moment on behalf of my patients for a very long time,” Francine Kaufman, MD, chief medical officer of the diabetes group at Medtronic, said in the release. “The data demonstrating the benefits of this system are compelling, and I’m confident it will simplify diabetes care for both patients and clinicians alike.”

Data on the MiniMed system previously published in JAMA demonstrated less glycemic variability, more time in target range, less exposure to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and reduced HbA1c, according to the release.

In March, a Customer Training Phase was initiated to train patients with type 1 diabetes how to use the system at several sites in the United States before a broad commercial launch.

“The MiniMed 670G system has been proven to be life-changing for many patients who participated in the Customer Training Phase, and we are truly excited to be able to introduce it to many more who stand to benefit. ... The constant vigilance that this chronic medical condition imposes on both patients and their families is now relaxed, and caregivers have a new level of independence and freedom,” Jennifer Lynn Sherr, MD, PhD, assistant professor of endocrinology at the Yale School of Medicine, said in the release. “As someone who lives with type 1 diabetes, it’s exciting to see this innovation alleviate much of the burden of managing this chronic disease.”

Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G system, the world’s first hybrid closed-loop system for people with type 1 diabetes, has been launched in the United States, according to a company press release.

The new system features Medtronic’s SmartGuard HCL technology and Guardian Sensor 3, the only FDA-approved insulin pump that enables personalized and automated delivery of basal insulin, according to the release. Blood glucose is also monitored using Ascensia Diabetes Care’s Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose monitoring system.

“This technology is a significant breakthrough for the diabetes community, and as a practicing endocrinologist, I have been awaiting this moment on behalf of my patients for a very long time,” Francine Kaufman, MD, chief medical officer of the diabetes group at Medtronic, said in the release. “The data demonstrating the benefits of this system are compelling, and I’m confident it will simplify diabetes care for both patients and clinicians alike.”

Data on the MiniMed system previously published in JAMA demonstrated less glycemic variability, more time in target range, less exposure to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and reduced HbA1c, according to the release.

In March, a Customer Training Phase was initiated to train patients with type 1 diabetes how to use the system at several sites in the United States before a broad commercial launch.

“The MiniMed 670G system has been proven to be life-changing for many patients who participated in the Customer Training Phase, and we are truly excited to be able to introduce it to many more who stand to benefit. ... The constant vigilance that this chronic medical condition imposes on both patients and their families is now relaxed, and caregivers have a new level of independence and freedom,” Jennifer Lynn Sherr, MD, PhD, assistant professor of endocrinology at the Yale School of Medicine, said in the release. “As someone who lives with type 1 diabetes, it’s exciting to see this innovation alleviate much of the burden of managing this chronic disease.”