Recent diabetes technology updates

Developments in diabetes technology have led experts to declare an imminent revolution in disease management. However, access to devices, ease of use for patients and data overload for providers, are just a few factors impeding change. Below are recent reports appearing in Endocrine Today and Healio.com about available technologies and teens’ attitudes toward disease management, as well as two stories about advancements for people with vision problems associated with diabetes.

 

In new era of diabetes tech, advancements poised to change management for type 1 and type 2

Technology for individuals with type 1 diabetes, such as insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors and other “smart” devices, are intended to improve regulation of blood glucose and reduce disease complications, all while simplifying management of a complicated disease. Yet overall uptake of such devices has remained low due to a combination of barriers, including cost, patient access, and large or bulky technology that was not the most user-friendly.

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Consumer technology improving diabetes, CVD management

As cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among all adults with diabetes, devices currently available to monitor glucose level, vital signs, arrhythmias, ejection fraction, oxygen saturation, cardiac events and even potassium levels, as well as deliver insulin, may contribute to better disease management.

READ

 

Teens and tech: Diabetes information generally not shared on social media

Despite their connectedness online, teens appear to be less inclined to share information about diabetes on social media. And, while teens tend to have positive attitudes about technology in general, attitudes about diabetes technologies are less favorable.

READ

 

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy revealed using OCT angiography

OCT angiography is new technology that provides a noninvasive imaging method to detect diabetic changes in vasculature prior to the onset of observable manifestations of diabetic retinopathy using traditional methods.

READ

 

Advanced device facilitates independence in low vision

Patients with low vision often feel frustration when attempting even the simplest of tasks, such as deciphering money or reading a food label. A new wearable device instantly and discreetly reads printed and digital text, from any surface, including newspaper, smartphone screens, soup cans or street signs.

READ

 

Developments in diabetes technology have led experts to declare an imminent revolution in disease management. However, access to devices, ease of use for patients and data overload for providers, are just a few factors impeding change. Below are recent reports appearing in Endocrine Today and Healio.com about available technologies and teens’ attitudes toward disease management, as well as two stories about advancements for people with vision problems associated with diabetes.

 

In new era of diabetes tech, advancements poised to change management for type 1 and type 2

Technology for individuals with type 1 diabetes, such as insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors and other “smart” devices, are intended to improve regulation of blood glucose and reduce disease complications, all while simplifying management of a complicated disease. Yet overall uptake of such devices has remained low due to a combination of barriers, including cost, patient access, and large or bulky technology that was not the most user-friendly.

READ

 

Consumer technology improving diabetes, CVD management

As cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among all adults with diabetes, devices currently available to monitor glucose level, vital signs, arrhythmias, ejection fraction, oxygen saturation, cardiac events and even potassium levels, as well as deliver insulin, may contribute to better disease management.

READ

 

Teens and tech: Diabetes information generally not shared on social media

Despite their connectedness online, teens appear to be less inclined to share information about diabetes on social media. And, while teens tend to have positive attitudes about technology in general, attitudes about diabetes technologies are less favorable.

READ

 

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy revealed using OCT angiography

OCT angiography is new technology that provides a noninvasive imaging method to detect diabetic changes in vasculature prior to the onset of observable manifestations of diabetic retinopathy using traditional methods.

READ

 

Advanced device facilitates independence in low vision

Patients with low vision often feel frustration when attempting even the simplest of tasks, such as deciphering money or reading a food label. A new wearable device instantly and discreetly reads printed and digital text, from any surface, including newspaper, smartphone screens, soup cans or street signs.

READ