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Duodenal-jejunal bypass liner improved glycemic control, weight

The duodenal-jejunal bypass liner device was a safe and effective device for the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, according to data presented at EASD 2013. The endoscopic device allowed improved glycemic control and body weight after 1 year of use.

“The device is very safe and effective, with a significant reduction in HbA1c. Over the course the device is in place, it causes significant weight loss in the majority of patients who have the device, and it offers a new and exciting alternative approach in the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes,” Julian Teare, MD, FRCP, of the department of gastroenterology at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and St. Mary's Hospital, London, said during a presentation.

The 45 patients implanted with the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner device had a baseline BMI of 39.6 kg/m2 (weight range: 167.4 lb to 381.4 lb) and an HbA1c of 8.5% (range: 7.2% to 10.5%), according to study data.

One year after the device was implanted, researchers reported a 4.4-kg/m2 decrease in patients’ BMI (change: 39.6 kg/m2 to 35.4 kg/m2), 26.4-lb decrease in body weight (change: 245.5 lb to 219.1 lb) and 1% decrease in HbA1c (8.5% to 7.5%) from baseline.

Other reductions were observed in fasting plasma glucose (–1.5 mmol/L), insulin usage (–3.8 mU/L), systolic blood pressure (–8.3 mm Hg) and diastolic BP (–2.7 mm Hg).

On the basis of this study, researchers are now working on a randomized controlled trial (80 patients vs. 80 controls) of a duodenal sleeve bypass device (EndoBarrier) compared with standard medical therapy for the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

For more information:

Teare J. Oral Presentation #83. Presented at: the 49th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes; Sept. 24-27, 2013; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: This study was supported by GI Dynamics Inc.

The duodenal-jejunal bypass liner device was a safe and effective device for the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, according to data presented at EASD 2013. The endoscopic device allowed improved glycemic control and body weight after 1 year of use.

“The device is very safe and effective, with a significant reduction in HbA1c. Over the course the device is in place, it causes significant weight loss in the majority of patients who have the device, and it offers a new and exciting alternative approach in the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes,” Julian Teare, MD, FRCP, of the department of gastroenterology at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and St. Mary's Hospital, London, said during a presentation.

The 45 patients implanted with the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner device had a baseline BMI of 39.6 kg/m2 (weight range: 167.4 lb to 381.4 lb) and an HbA1c of 8.5% (range: 7.2% to 10.5%), according to study data.

One year after the device was implanted, researchers reported a 4.4-kg/m2 decrease in patients’ BMI (change: 39.6 kg/m2 to 35.4 kg/m2), 26.4-lb decrease in body weight (change: 245.5 lb to 219.1 lb) and 1% decrease in HbA1c (8.5% to 7.5%) from baseline.

Other reductions were observed in fasting plasma glucose (–1.5 mmol/L), insulin usage (–3.8 mU/L), systolic blood pressure (–8.3 mm Hg) and diastolic BP (–2.7 mm Hg).

On the basis of this study, researchers are now working on a randomized controlled trial (80 patients vs. 80 controls) of a duodenal sleeve bypass device (EndoBarrier) compared with standard medical therapy for the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

For more information:

Teare J. Oral Presentation #83. Presented at: the 49th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes; Sept. 24-27, 2013; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: This study was supported by GI Dynamics Inc.

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