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Parent, child mealtime behavior plays critical role in diabetes management

SAN FRANCISCO — Parental and child mealtime behaviors play a crucial role in glycemic control and quality of life, according to data presented here at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions.

“When a young child is diagnosed with diabetes, it has a different burden on parents than with older children,” Maureen Monaghan, PhD, of Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., said during a presentation here. “In this study, we looked more specifically at relationships for indicators such as hypoglycemia fear, self-efficacy and quality of life, parent and child mealtime behavior and glycemic control in young children with type 1 diabetes.

Their study included parents (n=134; 90% women) of children (median age, 5.32 years; 49% girls; 78% white) with type 1 diabetes who completed self-reporting data inquiries on hypoglycemia fear, type 1 diabetes self-efficacy, and type 1 diabetes-related quality of life, in addition to child and parent mealtime behaviors.

The researchers observed significant effects among mealtime behavior and glycemic control, according to data. Moreover, increased child mealtime problems tended to predict poorer glycemic control (P=.04). Despite this, Monaghan said, frequent parent mealtime negative behaviors marginally predicted better glycemic control (P=.05).

Additional data indicated that poorer parent diabetes-specific functioning predicted more frequent mealtime behavioral problems in children and parents (P<.01 for both).

“From this cross-sectional study, we can draw the conclusions that mealtime management plays a critical role in parent function and diabetes indications,” Monaghan said. – by Samantha Costa

Disclosure: Monaghan reports no relevant financial disclosures.

For more information: Monaghan M. Abstract 258-OR. Presented at: American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions; June 13-17, 2014; San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO — Parental and child mealtime behaviors play a crucial role in glycemic control and quality of life, according to data presented here at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions.

“When a young child is diagnosed with diabetes, it has a different burden on parents than with older children,” Maureen Monaghan, PhD, of Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., said during a presentation here. “In this study, we looked more specifically at relationships for indicators such as hypoglycemia fear, self-efficacy and quality of life, parent and child mealtime behavior and glycemic control in young children with type 1 diabetes.

Their study included parents (n=134; 90% women) of children (median age, 5.32 years; 49% girls; 78% white) with type 1 diabetes who completed self-reporting data inquiries on hypoglycemia fear, type 1 diabetes self-efficacy, and type 1 diabetes-related quality of life, in addition to child and parent mealtime behaviors.

The researchers observed significant effects among mealtime behavior and glycemic control, according to data. Moreover, increased child mealtime problems tended to predict poorer glycemic control (P=.04). Despite this, Monaghan said, frequent parent mealtime negative behaviors marginally predicted better glycemic control (P=.05).

Additional data indicated that poorer parent diabetes-specific functioning predicted more frequent mealtime behavioral problems in children and parents (P<.01 for both).

“From this cross-sectional study, we can draw the conclusions that mealtime management plays a critical role in parent function and diabetes indications,” Monaghan said. – by Samantha Costa

Disclosure: Monaghan reports no relevant financial disclosures.

For more information: Monaghan M. Abstract 258-OR. Presented at: American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions; June 13-17, 2014; San Francisco.

    Perspective

    These parents are struggling with a lot of stressful issues surrounding diabetes management and whether those issues are influencing the mealtime behaviors and their sensitivity to those normal problems that come up in that age group; it seems like those are obviously behaviors that have a bigger cost with diabetes in terms of glucose control.

    • Jeffrey S. Gonzalez, PhD
    • Yeshiva University and Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Disclosures: Gonzalez reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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