Top 5 diabetes news reports from February

Endocrine Today has compiled a list of the top five diabetes news reports posted in February.

Healio.com/Endocrinology readers were interested in a new indication for a glucose sensor, the safety and efficacy of oral semaglutide, and much more.

New indication for Medtronic glucose sensor may improve accuracy with artificial pancreas

The FDA recently approved a new indication for Medtronic’s Guardian Sensor 3 allowing the device to be worn on the upper arm, according to a company press release.

The new sensor position is meant to allow for more flexibility and improved accuracy with a mean absolute relative difference of 8.7% after typical calibration methods used with the MiniMed 670G system. The Guardian Sensor 3 is the only FDA-approved sensor for use with a hybrid closed-loop system, or “artificial pancreas,” to control automated insulin delivery. Read more.

Oral semaglutide safe, effective in first phase 3 trial for type 2 diabetes

Results from the first phase 3 trial for an oral form of the GLP-1 receptor agonist semaglutide show the drug is safe and effective for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, with 80% of patients assigned the highest dose reaching HbA1c 7% or less over 26 weeks, Novo Nordisk announced in a press release.

In announcing headline results for PIONEER 1, the first phase 3a trial for once-daily, oral semaglutide, the company noted that participants assigned the drug experienced a reduction in both body weight and HbA1c compared with patients assigned placebo, with most patients reporting only mild to moderate nausea that diminished over time. Read more.

As widespread flu activity continues, diabetes compounds dangerous risks

The most recent reports from the CDC suggest that this season’s influenza outbreak is on course to be one of the worst in recent years, with overall hospitalizations already topping last year’s difficult influenza season and an alarming increase in influenza-associated deaths in children and adults.

The epidemic has not spared patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Even when the disease is well-managed, experts caution that influenza in the setting of diabetes puts patients at higher risk for serious complications, including pneumonia, bronchitis and sinus infections, all while causing blood glucose levels to fall to potentially dangerous levels. Read more.

Software bug led to FDA recall of Accu-Chek Connect Diabetes Management App

The FDA recently announced a recall of Roche Diabetes Care Inc.’s Accu-Chek Connect Diabetes Management App due to a software bug in the Bolus Advisor feature, according to a press release.

The recall warns that certain iOS and Android App versions contain the program bug: When the OS region of the phone setting is changed, the unit of measure may also unexpectedly change, causing users to incorrectly enter numerical values for carbohydrate used for bolus advice and the app to not transfer the blood glucose result. Read more.

FDA approves long-acting insulin titration system

The FDA has approved Glooko’s Mobile Insulin Dosing System for the titration of long-acting insulin for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a company press release.

The Mobile Insulin Dosing System, or MIDS, is the first insulin titration application accessible through a unified diabetes management platform, which provides a complete program for diabetes management, according to Glooko. The system includes access to a patient’s blood glucose data directly from their glucose meter, allowing people with diabetes to avoid manually entering fasting blood glucose information. Additionally, health care providers can access diabetes data in the MIDS module. Read more.

 

 

 

 

Endocrine Today has compiled a list of the top five diabetes news reports posted in February.

Healio.com/Endocrinology readers were interested in a new indication for a glucose sensor, the safety and efficacy of oral semaglutide, and much more.

New indication for Medtronic glucose sensor may improve accuracy with artificial pancreas

The FDA recently approved a new indication for Medtronic’s Guardian Sensor 3 allowing the device to be worn on the upper arm, according to a company press release.

The new sensor position is meant to allow for more flexibility and improved accuracy with a mean absolute relative difference of 8.7% after typical calibration methods used with the MiniMed 670G system. The Guardian Sensor 3 is the only FDA-approved sensor for use with a hybrid closed-loop system, or “artificial pancreas,” to control automated insulin delivery. Read more.

Oral semaglutide safe, effective in first phase 3 trial for type 2 diabetes

Results from the first phase 3 trial for an oral form of the GLP-1 receptor agonist semaglutide show the drug is safe and effective for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, with 80% of patients assigned the highest dose reaching HbA1c 7% or less over 26 weeks, Novo Nordisk announced in a press release.

In announcing headline results for PIONEER 1, the first phase 3a trial for once-daily, oral semaglutide, the company noted that participants assigned the drug experienced a reduction in both body weight and HbA1c compared with patients assigned placebo, with most patients reporting only mild to moderate nausea that diminished over time. Read more.

As widespread flu activity continues, diabetes compounds dangerous risks

The most recent reports from the CDC suggest that this season’s influenza outbreak is on course to be one of the worst in recent years, with overall hospitalizations already topping last year’s difficult influenza season and an alarming increase in influenza-associated deaths in children and adults.

The epidemic has not spared patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Even when the disease is well-managed, experts caution that influenza in the setting of diabetes puts patients at higher risk for serious complications, including pneumonia, bronchitis and sinus infections, all while causing blood glucose levels to fall to potentially dangerous levels. Read more.

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Software bug led to FDA recall of Accu-Chek Connect Diabetes Management App

The FDA recently announced a recall of Roche Diabetes Care Inc.’s Accu-Chek Connect Diabetes Management App due to a software bug in the Bolus Advisor feature, according to a press release.

The recall warns that certain iOS and Android App versions contain the program bug: When the OS region of the phone setting is changed, the unit of measure may also unexpectedly change, causing users to incorrectly enter numerical values for carbohydrate used for bolus advice and the app to not transfer the blood glucose result. Read more.

FDA approves long-acting insulin titration system

The FDA has approved Glooko’s Mobile Insulin Dosing System for the titration of long-acting insulin for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a company press release.

The Mobile Insulin Dosing System, or MIDS, is the first insulin titration application accessible through a unified diabetes management platform, which provides a complete program for diabetes management, according to Glooko. The system includes access to a patient’s blood glucose data directly from their glucose meter, allowing people with diabetes to avoid manually entering fasting blood glucose information. Additionally, health care providers can access diabetes data in the MIDS module. Read more.