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Prediabetes, diabetes comorbidities differ among children, women, men

In large cohort of individuals assessed for prediabetes and diabetes, prediabetes was identified in 4.6% of children and distinct cardiometabolic comorbidities were associated with both conditions for women and men, according to data presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting.

Alina Ofenheimer

“Prediabetes and diabetes are seen in young children aged 6 to 10 years and are therefore no longer diseases of middle age and older subjects,” Alina Ofenheimer, of Sigmund Freud University Medical School in Vienna, told Endocrine Today. “Considering sex and gender differences is important when studying and treating subjects with prediabetes and diabetes as their related comorbidity profile differs markedly.”

The researchers recruited 11,014 individuals aged 6 to 80 years for an observational, population-based cohort study to identify diabetes comorbidities associated with biological sex and behavioral gender. The researchers examined data from blood samples, ankle-brachial indexes, ECGs, DXA scans and questionnaires.

The researchers found that 20.2% of the total population had prediabetes, including 23.6% of men and boys and 17.1% of women and girls, based on the presence of a fasting plasma glucose level of 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL, an HbA1c of 5.7% to 6.5% or the use of medications to reduce glucose.

The analysis also revealed that 4.8% of girls and 4.4% of boys aged 6 to 10 years had prediabetes. In addition, 42.3% of women and 40.4% of men older than 70 years had prediabetes.

In large cohort of individuals assessed for prediabetes and diabetes, prediabetes was identified in 4.6% of children and distinct cardiometabolic comorbidities were associated with both conditions for women and men.
Source: Adobe Stock

“These data point out the importance of an onset of prevention of prediabetes and diabetes at a much younger age,” Ofenheimer said.

Additionally, 5.4% of the total population had diabetes based on the presence of FPG level of at least 126 mg/dL, an HbA1c of at least 6.5% or the use of medications to reduce glucose. Diabetes was identified in 7.3% of men and boys and 3.7% of women and girls.

Arrythmias, noncoronary artery disease, osteoporosis, increased systemic inflammatory biomarkers and depression were the most common comorbidities among women with diabetes or prediabetes. Angina pectoris, myocardial infarction and media sclerosis were the most common comorbidities among men with diabetes or prediabetes.

“This research shows marked differences in comorbidity profiles associated with prediabetes and diabetes between men and women,” Ofenheimer said. “Therefore, sex and gender differences have to be considered when studying and treating subjects with prediabetes and diabetes.” – by Phil Neuffer

Reference:

Ofenheimer A, et al. Abstract 295. Presented at: European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting; Sept. 16-20, 2019; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

In large cohort of individuals assessed for prediabetes and diabetes, prediabetes was identified in 4.6% of children and distinct cardiometabolic comorbidities were associated with both conditions for women and men, according to data presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting.

Alina Ofenheimer

“Prediabetes and diabetes are seen in young children aged 6 to 10 years and are therefore no longer diseases of middle age and older subjects,” Alina Ofenheimer, of Sigmund Freud University Medical School in Vienna, told Endocrine Today. “Considering sex and gender differences is important when studying and treating subjects with prediabetes and diabetes as their related comorbidity profile differs markedly.”

The researchers recruited 11,014 individuals aged 6 to 80 years for an observational, population-based cohort study to identify diabetes comorbidities associated with biological sex and behavioral gender. The researchers examined data from blood samples, ankle-brachial indexes, ECGs, DXA scans and questionnaires.

The researchers found that 20.2% of the total population had prediabetes, including 23.6% of men and boys and 17.1% of women and girls, based on the presence of a fasting plasma glucose level of 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL, an HbA1c of 5.7% to 6.5% or the use of medications to reduce glucose.

The analysis also revealed that 4.8% of girls and 4.4% of boys aged 6 to 10 years had prediabetes. In addition, 42.3% of women and 40.4% of men older than 70 years had prediabetes.

In large cohort of individuals assessed for prediabetes and diabetes, prediabetes was identified in 4.6% of children and distinct cardiometabolic comorbidities were associated with both conditions for women and men.
Source: Adobe Stock

“These data point out the importance of an onset of prevention of prediabetes and diabetes at a much younger age,” Ofenheimer said.

Additionally, 5.4% of the total population had diabetes based on the presence of FPG level of at least 126 mg/dL, an HbA1c of at least 6.5% or the use of medications to reduce glucose. Diabetes was identified in 7.3% of men and boys and 3.7% of women and girls.

Arrythmias, noncoronary artery disease, osteoporosis, increased systemic inflammatory biomarkers and depression were the most common comorbidities among women with diabetes or prediabetes. Angina pectoris, myocardial infarction and media sclerosis were the most common comorbidities among men with diabetes or prediabetes.

“This research shows marked differences in comorbidity profiles associated with prediabetes and diabetes between men and women,” Ofenheimer said. “Therefore, sex and gender differences have to be considered when studying and treating subjects with prediabetes and diabetes.” – by Phil Neuffer

Reference:

Ofenheimer A, et al. Abstract 295. Presented at: European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting; Sept. 16-20, 2019; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

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