In the Journals

High-potency statins may increase risk for kidney injury

Recent data demonstrate that use of high-potency statins increased the risk for acute kidney injury in patients by 34% compared with low-potency statin use.

Researchers in Canada conducted a retrospective, observational analysis of 2 million patients, aged 40 years or older, who were newly prescribed high-potency statins in seven Canadian provinces, the United States and the United Kingdom between 1997 and 2008 (mean age, 68 years; 50% women).

Colin R. Dormuth, MD 

Colin R. Dormuth

High-potency statins were defined as those that produced a ≤45% reduction in LDL. Rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) at 10 mg or more, atorvastatin (Lipitor, Pfizer) at 20 mg or more and simvastatin at 40 mg or more were defined as high-potency statins.

Overall, 2,067,639 patients were newly exposed to statins. The researchers recorded 59,636 patients with chronic kidney injury using statins within 3 years before cohort entry. Within 120 days of treatment, 4,691 patients with non-chronic kidney disease were hospitalized for acute kidney injury and 1,896 were hospitalized with chronic kidney injury. Researchers found that high-potency statin users were 34% more likely to be hospitalized with acute kidney injury within 120 days compared with low-potency statin users. This risk remained elevated for 2 years after initiation (fixed-effect rate ratio=1.34; 95% CI, 1.25-1.43). Those who took high-potency statins with chronic kidney disease did not have as large an increase in admission rate (1.1).

“We estimate that 1,700 patients with non-chronic kidney disease need to be treated with a high-potency statin instead of a low-potency statin for 120 days to cause one additional hospitalization for acute kidney injury,” Colin R. Dormuth, MD, of the department of anesthesiology, pharmacology and therapeutics at the University of British Columbia, Canada, and colleagues wrote in the study.

Disclosure: Dormuth reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Recent data demonstrate that use of high-potency statins increased the risk for acute kidney injury in patients by 34% compared with low-potency statin use.

Researchers in Canada conducted a retrospective, observational analysis of 2 million patients, aged 40 years or older, who were newly prescribed high-potency statins in seven Canadian provinces, the United States and the United Kingdom between 1997 and 2008 (mean age, 68 years; 50% women).

Colin R. Dormuth, MD 

Colin R. Dormuth

High-potency statins were defined as those that produced a ≤45% reduction in LDL. Rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) at 10 mg or more, atorvastatin (Lipitor, Pfizer) at 20 mg or more and simvastatin at 40 mg or more were defined as high-potency statins.

Overall, 2,067,639 patients were newly exposed to statins. The researchers recorded 59,636 patients with chronic kidney injury using statins within 3 years before cohort entry. Within 120 days of treatment, 4,691 patients with non-chronic kidney disease were hospitalized for acute kidney injury and 1,896 were hospitalized with chronic kidney injury. Researchers found that high-potency statin users were 34% more likely to be hospitalized with acute kidney injury within 120 days compared with low-potency statin users. This risk remained elevated for 2 years after initiation (fixed-effect rate ratio=1.34; 95% CI, 1.25-1.43). Those who took high-potency statins with chronic kidney disease did not have as large an increase in admission rate (1.1).

“We estimate that 1,700 patients with non-chronic kidney disease need to be treated with a high-potency statin instead of a low-potency statin for 120 days to cause one additional hospitalization for acute kidney injury,” Colin R. Dormuth, MD, of the department of anesthesiology, pharmacology and therapeutics at the University of British Columbia, Canada, and colleagues wrote in the study.

Disclosure: Dormuth reports no relevant financial disclosures.