Meeting News

Analyses show cost savings of omadacycline for ABSSSI

Two cost-benefit analyses presented at the annual meeting of the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases in Vienna reported the potential of cost savings of IV-to-oral omadacycline compared with the current standard of care for patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection.

“The most direct approach to reducing the financial burden for the treatment of patients with skin and skin structure infection is to avoid admitting patients that can be safely and effectively managed in the outpatient setting,” researcher Thomas Lodise, PharmD, PhD, professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, New York, stated in a news release from Paratek Pharmaceuticals. “Failing this, the next approach to reduce health care costs associated with the management of admitted [acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs)] is to facilitate the patients’ early discharge onto oral antibiotics as soon as they become stable.”

Omadacycline is an oral and IV once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic with a broad spectrum activity, including MRSA, under development for treating ABSSSI.

In the first analysis, researchers found that the median length of stay for patients with ABSSSI with at least two comorbidities and no life-threatening conditions was 5 days, with each hospital day estimated to cost $1,346. In a hospital perspective, excluding outpatient cost, omadacycline was estimated as cost saving with a 1-day hospital length of stay reduction, if the daily cost of omadacycline was $543 or less. The payers’ perspective included outpatient treatment costs, and omadacycline was cost saving with 2 days’ length of stay reduction at all omadacycline daily cost levels below $410 per day.

The second analysis compared the costs of inpatient IV vancomycin, the current standard of care, with outpatient omadacycline for treating patients with ABSSSI with few or no comorbidities presenting to the ED.

The researchers estimated that treatment with vancomycin in the hospital was $6,525 per course of therapy, while successfully switching a patient from vancomycin inpatient treatment to outpatient omadacycline was estimated to save $2,491 to $3,300 per patient.

“It is estimated that up to 48% of [omadacycline] patients discharged home from the [ED] could be subsequently admitted, while still maintaining budget neutrality,” the researchers wrote. “Cost-saving for ABSSSI patients may be realized with omadacycline relative to vancomycin inpatient treatment if hospitalization is avoided due to outpatient management of OMC.”

“The results of today’s cost-modeling studies are encouraging as they suggest that IV-to-oral omadacycline, if approved, has the potential to create savings for both hospitals and payers,” Lodise stated in the release. – by Bruce Thiel

 

 

References:

 

www.paratekphamarma.com

 

Lapensee K, Lodise T. P1265.

Lapensee K, Lodise T. P1266.

Both presented at: European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases; April 22-25, Vienna.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Dermatology could not determine relevant financial disclosures at time of publication.

 

Two cost-benefit analyses presented at the annual meeting of the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases in Vienna reported the potential of cost savings of IV-to-oral omadacycline compared with the current standard of care for patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection.

“The most direct approach to reducing the financial burden for the treatment of patients with skin and skin structure infection is to avoid admitting patients that can be safely and effectively managed in the outpatient setting,” researcher Thomas Lodise, PharmD, PhD, professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, New York, stated in a news release from Paratek Pharmaceuticals. “Failing this, the next approach to reduce health care costs associated with the management of admitted [acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs)] is to facilitate the patients’ early discharge onto oral antibiotics as soon as they become stable.”

Omadacycline is an oral and IV once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic with a broad spectrum activity, including MRSA, under development for treating ABSSSI.

In the first analysis, researchers found that the median length of stay for patients with ABSSSI with at least two comorbidities and no life-threatening conditions was 5 days, with each hospital day estimated to cost $1,346. In a hospital perspective, excluding outpatient cost, omadacycline was estimated as cost saving with a 1-day hospital length of stay reduction, if the daily cost of omadacycline was $543 or less. The payers’ perspective included outpatient treatment costs, and omadacycline was cost saving with 2 days’ length of stay reduction at all omadacycline daily cost levels below $410 per day.

The second analysis compared the costs of inpatient IV vancomycin, the current standard of care, with outpatient omadacycline for treating patients with ABSSSI with few or no comorbidities presenting to the ED.

The researchers estimated that treatment with vancomycin in the hospital was $6,525 per course of therapy, while successfully switching a patient from vancomycin inpatient treatment to outpatient omadacycline was estimated to save $2,491 to $3,300 per patient.

“It is estimated that up to 48% of [omadacycline] patients discharged home from the [ED] could be subsequently admitted, while still maintaining budget neutrality,” the researchers wrote. “Cost-saving for ABSSSI patients may be realized with omadacycline relative to vancomycin inpatient treatment if hospitalization is avoided due to outpatient management of OMC.”

“The results of today’s cost-modeling studies are encouraging as they suggest that IV-to-oral omadacycline, if approved, has the potential to create savings for both hospitals and payers,” Lodise stated in the release. – by Bruce Thiel

 

 

References:

 

www.paratekphamarma.com

 

Lapensee K, Lodise T. P1265.

Lapensee K, Lodise T. P1266.

Both presented at: European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases; April 22-25, Vienna.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Dermatology could not determine relevant financial disclosures at time of publication.