Rosacea survey shows clear skin dramatically improves well-being

Patients who experienced significant elimination of signs and symptoms of rosacea reported a dramatic positive improvement in their lives, according to a survey of 1,044 patients conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

“The results of this survey suggest that ... achieving clear skin through new advances in medical therapy has the potential to greatly improve a rosacea patient’s personal well-being in many ways,” Hilary Baldwin, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, said in a press release from the National Rosacea Society.

After treatment, 76% of respondents saw at least some improvement in their skin. Of those, 40% had an improvement in their psychological well-being, 35% said their social well-being improved and 31% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

In those who achieved clear or almost clear skin, 81% of respondents reported an improvement in their psychological well-being, while 71% saw an improvement in their social lives and 62% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

The positive impact was lower among patients whose rosacea was only slightly or moderately improved. Only 24% of respondents reported improved psychological well-being, 21% reported an improvement in their social lives and 19% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

Facial redness was reported in 95% of respondents, bumps and pimples in 80%, flushing in 74%, burning or stinging sensations in 59% and eye irritation in 54%.

 

Source: rosacea.org

Patients who experienced significant elimination of signs and symptoms of rosacea reported a dramatic positive improvement in their lives, according to a survey of 1,044 patients conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

“The results of this survey suggest that ... achieving clear skin through new advances in medical therapy has the potential to greatly improve a rosacea patient’s personal well-being in many ways,” Hilary Baldwin, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, said in a press release from the National Rosacea Society.

After treatment, 76% of respondents saw at least some improvement in their skin. Of those, 40% had an improvement in their psychological well-being, 35% said their social well-being improved and 31% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

In those who achieved clear or almost clear skin, 81% of respondents reported an improvement in their psychological well-being, while 71% saw an improvement in their social lives and 62% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

The positive impact was lower among patients whose rosacea was only slightly or moderately improved. Only 24% of respondents reported improved psychological well-being, 21% reported an improvement in their social lives and 19% reported an improvement in their occupational well-being.

Facial redness was reported in 95% of respondents, bumps and pimples in 80%, flushing in 74%, burning or stinging sensations in 59% and eye irritation in 54%.

 

Source: rosacea.org