UCB reports bimekizumab response rates superior to Stelara in psoriasis

Mark Lebwohl, MD
Mark Lebwohl

Treatment with bimekizumab, an interleukin-17A and IL-17F inhibitor in adults with chronic plaque psoriasis, resulted in at least a 90% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and Investigator Global Assessment score of clear or almost clear, according to phase 3 results from the development program BE VIVID by UCB.

“The data that we’ve seen here is among the highest response rates among all of the drugs that we have in psoriasis to date,” study investigator Mark Lebwohl, MD, Waldman professor of dermatology and chair of the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman department of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told Healio Dermatology. “Literally at every endpoint they are charting new territory in terms of increasing response rates.”

The study was an active comparative control with three treatment arms: bimekizumab (UCB), Stelara (ustekinumab, Janssen) and placebo injections, according to Lebwohl.

The full results are not yet published, and these data represent the first of three phase 3 studies. BE VIVID is a randomized, 52-week, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study that enrolled 570 participants with chronic plaque psoriasis for at least 6 months prior to screening and an affected body surface area of at least 10% and PASI of at least 12, according to a company press release.

Additionally, bimekizumab was found superior to ustekinumab by reaching PASI-90 and IGA 0/1 as well as superiority to placebo in total skin clearance at week 16.

While ustekinumab blocks IL-12 and IL-23, bimekizumab blocks IL-17A and IL-17F. “Which is different than all of the other IL-17 blockers,” Lebwohl added.

The safety profile of bimekizumab was consistent with the earlier BE ABLE phase 2 studies, according to the release.

“The safety and efficacy looks great and I can’t imagine [bimekizumab] won’t get approved. This would be a big boost in what we can do for patients with psoriasis,” Lebwohl said.

Bimekizumab would be useful in patients with the most severe disease and also in patients who have more moderate disease, he said. – by Abigail Sutton

 

 

Disclosure: Lebwohl reports he has served as un unpaid consultant and investigator for UCB Pharmaceuticals.

Mark Lebwohl, MD
Mark Lebwohl

Treatment with bimekizumab, an interleukin-17A and IL-17F inhibitor in adults with chronic plaque psoriasis, resulted in at least a 90% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and Investigator Global Assessment score of clear or almost clear, according to phase 3 results from the development program BE VIVID by UCB.

“The data that we’ve seen here is among the highest response rates among all of the drugs that we have in psoriasis to date,” study investigator Mark Lebwohl, MD, Waldman professor of dermatology and chair of the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman department of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told Healio Dermatology. “Literally at every endpoint they are charting new territory in terms of increasing response rates.”

The study was an active comparative control with three treatment arms: bimekizumab (UCB), Stelara (ustekinumab, Janssen) and placebo injections, according to Lebwohl.

The full results are not yet published, and these data represent the first of three phase 3 studies. BE VIVID is a randomized, 52-week, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study that enrolled 570 participants with chronic plaque psoriasis for at least 6 months prior to screening and an affected body surface area of at least 10% and PASI of at least 12, according to a company press release.

Additionally, bimekizumab was found superior to ustekinumab by reaching PASI-90 and IGA 0/1 as well as superiority to placebo in total skin clearance at week 16.

While ustekinumab blocks IL-12 and IL-23, bimekizumab blocks IL-17A and IL-17F. “Which is different than all of the other IL-17 blockers,” Lebwohl added.

The safety profile of bimekizumab was consistent with the earlier BE ABLE phase 2 studies, according to the release.

“The safety and efficacy looks great and I can’t imagine [bimekizumab] won’t get approved. This would be a big boost in what we can do for patients with psoriasis,” Lebwohl said.

Bimekizumab would be useful in patients with the most severe disease and also in patients who have more moderate disease, he said. – by Abigail Sutton

 

 

Disclosure: Lebwohl reports he has served as un unpaid consultant and investigator for UCB Pharmaceuticals.