In the Journals

Psoriasis Symptom Inventory enhances physician-patient conversation, guides treatment

Physicians received new information about their patients with psoriasis by employing the Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, a patient-reported measure of signs and symptoms, according to a study in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

The Psoriasis Symptom Inventory (PSI) may be particularly useful in patients with severe disease and aid physicians with decision-making. The PSI could also be indicative of the amount of time that may be required for a particular patient visit, the researchers wrote.

“Despite the greater amount of time spent discussing the PSI in patients with more severe disease, physicians treating those patients reported an influence of the PSI discussion on treatment decisions,” Bruce Strober, MD, PhD, professor of dermatology at the University of Connecticut Health Center, and colleagues wrote.

The patient-reported measure quantifies the perception of psoriasis signs and symptoms through an 8-item questionnaire on itching, redness, scaling, burning, stinging, cracking, flaking and pain, with a scale of 0 (not at all) to 3 (very severe) and a score ranging from 0 to 32.

The clinics enrolled 278 adults with mild to severe psoriasis (57.9% men; mean age, 47.5 years).

Mild psoriasis was identified in 47.8% (range, 40% to 67.5%), moderate psoriasis in 29.1% (range, 12.5% to 40%) and severe psoriasis was found in 23% (range, 17.5% to 42.9%).

The researchers reported a static Physician’s Global Assessment (sPGA) score, across of all patients, of 0 to 1 (clear or almost clear) in 18.7% (range, 2.9% to 28.6%), an sPGA score of 2 to 3 (mild to moderate) in 67.3% (range, 42.9% to 91.4%) and an sPGA score of 4 to 5 (severe to very severe) in 14% (range, 0% to 37.1%).

The mean PSI total score for all patients was 12.2 (standard deviation, 8.3). Higher mean PSI scores were reported from study sites that had a greater number of patients with severe disease.

Based on PSI score, 107 (38.5%) patients had no/mild symptoms, 89 (32%) had moderate symptoms, 57 (20.5%) had severe symptoms and 25 (9%) had very severe symptoms.

As for the time to complete the survey, it had a low time constraint, according to the researchers, with a mean 4.9 minutes spent discussing the PSI with patients (range, 0 to 20 minutes).

“In the surveys, physicians noted that symptoms not usually discussed in routine visits were discussed in the context of the PSI, and patients were encouraged to discuss new information,” Strober and colleagues wrote.

Patients were also able to discuss sensitive issues like genital symptoms with help from the PSI, researchers added. – by Abigail Sutton

 

 

 

Disclosures: Strober reports he serves as a consultant for AbbVie, Almirall, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Celgene Corp., Dermira, Janssen Global Services, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, LEO Pharma, Medac Pharma Inc., Menlo Therapeutics, Novartis AG, Pfizer Inc., Sun Pharma, UCB, and Ortho Dermatologics/Valeant Pharmaceuticals; is an investigator for AbbVie, Boehringer Ingelheim, Celgene Corp., Eli Lilly & Co., Galderma, Janssen Global Services, Merck & Co., and Sienna Biopharmaceuticals; and is scientific director for Corrona Psoriasis Registry and has received grant support to the University of Connecticut Fellowship Program from AbbVie and Janssen Global Services.

 

Physicians received new information about their patients with psoriasis by employing the Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, a patient-reported measure of signs and symptoms, according to a study in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

The Psoriasis Symptom Inventory (PSI) may be particularly useful in patients with severe disease and aid physicians with decision-making. The PSI could also be indicative of the amount of time that may be required for a particular patient visit, the researchers wrote.

“Despite the greater amount of time spent discussing the PSI in patients with more severe disease, physicians treating those patients reported an influence of the PSI discussion on treatment decisions,” Bruce Strober, MD, PhD, professor of dermatology at the University of Connecticut Health Center, and colleagues wrote.

The patient-reported measure quantifies the perception of psoriasis signs and symptoms through an 8-item questionnaire on itching, redness, scaling, burning, stinging, cracking, flaking and pain, with a scale of 0 (not at all) to 3 (very severe) and a score ranging from 0 to 32.

The clinics enrolled 278 adults with mild to severe psoriasis (57.9% men; mean age, 47.5 years).

Mild psoriasis was identified in 47.8% (range, 40% to 67.5%), moderate psoriasis in 29.1% (range, 12.5% to 40%) and severe psoriasis was found in 23% (range, 17.5% to 42.9%).

The researchers reported a static Physician’s Global Assessment (sPGA) score, across of all patients, of 0 to 1 (clear or almost clear) in 18.7% (range, 2.9% to 28.6%), an sPGA score of 2 to 3 (mild to moderate) in 67.3% (range, 42.9% to 91.4%) and an sPGA score of 4 to 5 (severe to very severe) in 14% (range, 0% to 37.1%).

The mean PSI total score for all patients was 12.2 (standard deviation, 8.3). Higher mean PSI scores were reported from study sites that had a greater number of patients with severe disease.

Based on PSI score, 107 (38.5%) patients had no/mild symptoms, 89 (32%) had moderate symptoms, 57 (20.5%) had severe symptoms and 25 (9%) had very severe symptoms.

As for the time to complete the survey, it had a low time constraint, according to the researchers, with a mean 4.9 minutes spent discussing the PSI with patients (range, 0 to 20 minutes).

“In the surveys, physicians noted that symptoms not usually discussed in routine visits were discussed in the context of the PSI, and patients were encouraged to discuss new information,” Strober and colleagues wrote.

Patients were also able to discuss sensitive issues like genital symptoms with help from the PSI, researchers added. – by Abigail Sutton

 

 

 

Disclosures: Strober reports he serves as a consultant for AbbVie, Almirall, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Celgene Corp., Dermira, Janssen Global Services, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, LEO Pharma, Medac Pharma Inc., Menlo Therapeutics, Novartis AG, Pfizer Inc., Sun Pharma, UCB, and Ortho Dermatologics/Valeant Pharmaceuticals; is an investigator for AbbVie, Boehringer Ingelheim, Celgene Corp., Eli Lilly & Co., Galderma, Janssen Global Services, Merck & Co., and Sienna Biopharmaceuticals; and is scientific director for Corrona Psoriasis Registry and has received grant support to the University of Connecticut Fellowship Program from AbbVie and Janssen Global Services.