AAD supports high-quality, responsible applications of augmented intelligence

The American Academy of Dermatology supports the collaborative development of augmented intelligence that is designed and evaluated in a manner that enables the delivery of high-quality patient care, the AAD wrote in its augmented intelligence position statement.

The term “augmented” reinforces the critical role human intelligence plays when machine learning and algorithms are used to discover clinical relationships and solve problems, according to the AAD.

“Clinicians should spend time conducting work appropriate for their skills and training while being able to delegate algorithmic tasks to machines, with the goals of enhancing patient care,” according to the statement.

Collaborative engagement is important for the development of augmented intelligence applications. Augmented intelligence has the potential to improve patients experience, population health, reduce costs and improve the professional fulfillment of care teams.

“Early [artificial intelligence] efforts (within medicine) ... include enabling novel insights into health and disease including in risk assessment and triage, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring, supporting patient engagement, and improving care team efficiency,” according to the statement.

The accuracy of augmented intelligence technology is subject to the quality and source of the data used to develop the augmented intelligence model, according to the AAD. “The characteristics of these data sets influence the nature of the algorithms generated and carry the potential to extend bias to delivery of clinical care if the data sets are not representative of the population in which AI algorithms will be used.”

The AAD recommends transparency in data labeling methods and characteristics of the training data set whenever possible.

In addition, prospective clinical trials with clinical endpoints based on the intended use of the technology should be performed to validate the augmented intelligence for patient care.

“Engagement of and collaboration with stakeholders is essential,” according to the AAD. “For patients and providers, studies on acceptability, feasibility, predictive accuracy and clinical outcomes may identify areas of greatest need, adoption barriers and adaptability of these tools to different clinical settings.

“There should be clarity in the symbiotic and synergistic roles of [augmented intelligence] and human judgment so that it is clear to the patient and provider when and how this technology is utilized to augment human judgment and interpretation,” according to the statement.

Another top priority is safeguarding protected health information.

The AAD plans to work with colleagues to create policies that promote augmented intelligence that is high quality, inclusive, equitable and accessible, they concluded. – by Abigail Sutton

 

For more information:

American Academy of Dermatology. Position Statement on Augmented Intelligence. Accessed July 15, 2019. https://www.aad.org/Forms/Policies/Uploads/PS/PS-Augmented%20Intelligence.pdf

 

The American Academy of Dermatology supports the collaborative development of augmented intelligence that is designed and evaluated in a manner that enables the delivery of high-quality patient care, the AAD wrote in its augmented intelligence position statement.

The term “augmented” reinforces the critical role human intelligence plays when machine learning and algorithms are used to discover clinical relationships and solve problems, according to the AAD.

“Clinicians should spend time conducting work appropriate for their skills and training while being able to delegate algorithmic tasks to machines, with the goals of enhancing patient care,” according to the statement.

Collaborative engagement is important for the development of augmented intelligence applications. Augmented intelligence has the potential to improve patients experience, population health, reduce costs and improve the professional fulfillment of care teams.

“Early [artificial intelligence] efforts (within medicine) ... include enabling novel insights into health and disease including in risk assessment and triage, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring, supporting patient engagement, and improving care team efficiency,” according to the statement.

The accuracy of augmented intelligence technology is subject to the quality and source of the data used to develop the augmented intelligence model, according to the AAD. “The characteristics of these data sets influence the nature of the algorithms generated and carry the potential to extend bias to delivery of clinical care if the data sets are not representative of the population in which AI algorithms will be used.”

The AAD recommends transparency in data labeling methods and characteristics of the training data set whenever possible.

In addition, prospective clinical trials with clinical endpoints based on the intended use of the technology should be performed to validate the augmented intelligence for patient care.

“Engagement of and collaboration with stakeholders is essential,” according to the AAD. “For patients and providers, studies on acceptability, feasibility, predictive accuracy and clinical outcomes may identify areas of greatest need, adoption barriers and adaptability of these tools to different clinical settings.

“There should be clarity in the symbiotic and synergistic roles of [augmented intelligence] and human judgment so that it is clear to the patient and provider when and how this technology is utilized to augment human judgment and interpretation,” according to the statement.

Another top priority is safeguarding protected health information.

The AAD plans to work with colleagues to create policies that promote augmented intelligence that is high quality, inclusive, equitable and accessible, they concluded. – by Abigail Sutton

 

For more information:

American Academy of Dermatology. Position Statement on Augmented Intelligence. Accessed July 15, 2019. https://www.aad.org/Forms/Policies/Uploads/PS/PS-Augmented%20Intelligence.pdf